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  1. Today
  2. 1949threepence

    Ebay's Worst Offerings

    Nothing new there. By the way "think"? that's almost as bad as "could" lol
  3. 1949threepence

    Ebay's Worst Offerings

    Couldn't agree more (no reverse pun intended). All guidance, especially any with legal ramifications, needs to be crystal clear and set out in terms which normal people can comprehend. That means not using odd terminology, at variance with conventional use of the English language, which can be open to misinterpretation. erm, what do you mean by "could"? - dunno really, might do, if we feel like it on the day, depends what mood the agent's in, if we can be arsed to bother, if the agent is properly trained. Depends on a range of options which we won't worry your little heads with by bothering to list here, etc etc (along with the words "might" and "may") "Will" - it happens regardless. You know where you stand.
  4. Rob

    Ebay's Worst Offerings

    Nothing with the wording 'could' is a policy. Rules need to be black and white, not a series of hedged bets at someone's convenience. If in doubt leave it out - just as the person trying to sell me a mortgage for a rental property said 'you don't have to tell them'. Yeh, ok, not.
  5. Sword

    Ebay's Worst Offerings

    It's not clearly written but I think it does not apply to photos of approved companies. "Activity that doesn't follow eBay policy could result in a range of actions including for example: administratively ending,..." Maybe it would be good sport if Ebay add this emoji 😉 after the statement.
  6. 1949threepence

    Ebay's Worst Offerings

    But then you dig a little deeper and you find this which explains the real position. Although no date is given (unless it's in invisible ink), so logically, one must assume it's current policy, not one prospective to an unknown (precise) date in 2021. Although the bit I've emboldened doesn't make sense (to me anyway) if it applies to photos of coins in e bay approved company slabs.
  7. Well, I hope it wasn't made for collectors! I can't do photos unfortunately but I bought both this and a Wm and Mary Tin halfpenny fake off ebay in 2007 for £40, which considering they had been sold for £140 hammer along with a poor genuine Wm and Mary tin 1/2 at Gregory II (Baldwins Auction 47; lot 353, Sept 2006), was a good bargain I thought, as these were the two interesting pieces. It is photographed in the Baldwins catalogue though, if you've got access to that. The Wm and Mary fake, also from false dies, is a much better effort, though still crude - the reverse only of this is shown. It's the only JII tin fake I've ever come across and very crude. The plug has been inserted after striking as can be seen from the large amount of solder around it. You can see one reversed N in the photograph of "NIA". I would think it's contemporary, considering its crudeness and thinness (no edge reading), and it had been in Baldwins basement for probably many decades. The Wm and Mary had an old ticket with it saying "from false dies".
  8. Rob

    Ebay's Worst Offerings

    You are allowed to start a new one called XXXX's worst offerings. Any banning of coin sales by ebay opens up an opportunity for someone else. If I read it correctly, the problem is with the payment processors. I can't see eBay being willing to give up a cash cow, which it must be given the number of listings, whether free to list or not. If an alternative appeared, one option would be a flat rate payment to list items for a given period of time, with money back in part for a sale and the ability to do buyer/seller payments directly which would allow all parties to get on with life. Plus the amount of crap would be seriously reduced. Elimination of this is impossible, but can be restricted by an up front fee. If you had to pay say a flat 5% fee with a minimum value to the platform for hosting the listing, so charged 10% up front with half refunded when sold, it would encourage desirable things to be listed, whilst restricting the rare 1971 pennies. Sure it would reduce the number of dire rarities available, but the quality of life would improve immensely.
  9. Presumably a contemporary forgery, though ? I'd be interested to see photographs, not something I've come across before.
  10. Ooh, interesting ! I'm going to have to weigh all of mine now to see where they stand...
  11. VickySilver

    PCGS

    Yes, I agree, and about the OP coin as well. You can find another, slabbed or not, that will be nicer. Good.
  12. Yesterday
  13. blakeyboy

    Ebay's Worst Offerings

    I know. I saw the police reports.....
  14. ozjohn

    PCGS

    Hi Vicky I've long since upgraded this coin. As it happens with a PCGS MS 63 version which I obtained from Sterling & Curency of Fremantle, West Australia , for a good price. As it happens I brought the coin not the grade. That's the good thing with slabbed coins when the stated grade and the true grade coincide. Which is not always the case as demonstrated by the subject of this thread..
  15. Rob

    Commonwealth 'Overdates'

    It's conceivable that all were responsible. Simon is known to have been employed in 1649 as chief engraver, so having been promoted to that position I can envisage Simon being required to and producing a new design in fairly quick time to allow the rapid entry of the Commonwealth currency into circulation. What is less likely is that he was regularly employed in engraving currency dies. It's fair to say that the simplicity of the design would mean that any engraver with a few rudimentary skills could produce either die, and the quality of some dies where the legend is left wanting in both alignment and spelling suggests it was a person of relatively lower skill that was responsible. The question therefore is whether documentary evidence occurs to swing the evidence one way or the other. but given his primary role was the production of seals which obviously required a much higher level of skill than the currency dies, I would think that the vast majority of dies were cut by the under-engravers.
  16. Diaconis

    Commonwealth 'Overdates'

    Not strictly related to the topic at hand but still a question related to the Commonwealth coinage however after the appointment of Simon. Brooke, in English Coins, mentions that the breeches coinage was probably the work of under-gravers East and Burgh whereas Oman, in the Coinage of England, states "... Simon, the talented engraver to the mint, must have chafed sadly at the bald design that he was directed to reproduce." Considering that both books were published within a year of each other, and by such learned scholars, I find it strange that they held such varying opinions. Any thoughts?
  17. Weaver

    Quadrums - where to buy pick 'n' mix sizes

    Thanks Sword. That's a good way of selecting what storage option in relation to grade. Cheers, Weaver(wayne)
  18. The flans for charles II farthings were surplied from sweden so it probably was not the royal mints fault they were a bit over - still its careless and must have cost the swedish compay that provided them loads - it was rhe last time they were used 1679 I think. yummy coin by the way
  19. I don't use them myself but I am sure they are safe if Colin Cooke is selling them. You can e-mail to check if they are acid-free and I have no doubt they will say yes. Here is an alternative (from Rob): https://www.rpcoins.co.uk/collections/accessories/products/00099999 I think they are a good choice for circulated coins. You probably want to keep EF or better in quadrums or 2x2.
  20. Weaver

    Ebay's Worst Offerings

    Yes my friend, the Help and Care building. Pop in any time on a Wed to say hello (after Covid) ok? We could look in a few of the antique stores further up the road. All the best, Weaver(wayne)
  21. Weaver

    Quadrums - where to buy pick 'n' mix sizes

    And those are 100% genuinely acid-free envelopes yeah? And out of interest bagerap, do you store all metal types of coins (and medals of course) in them? All of my collection is circulated, so I am now leaning towards acid-free envelopes. Basically, I want the safest possible long term storage option. Thoughts... Cheers, Weaver(wayne)
  22. Large flan farthings of george III are quite common - I dont think quality control was very good back then....
  23. I've got a James II tin farthing forgery - so amateurish that that N's are back to front ie the die sinker forgot that the lettering reverses on the actual coin.
  24. hibernianscribe

    Ebay's Worst Offerings

    I picked this snippet from Cointalk concerning a discussion that was taking place on the ebay community website about 3 months ago... https://community.ebay.com/t5/Selli...w-the-sale-or-purchase-of-Coins/td-p/30666292 Does this spell the end of this thread?? Frank
  25. bagerap

    Quadrums - where to buy pick 'n' mix sizes

    I ordered 500 yesterday: http://www.colincooke.com/other/envelopes.html
  26. There are a few rust spots on the die, which is what I presume you can see to the right of Britannia. The S after BRITAN is ink. The reverse has a number of ink marks, two lines of which read BASING HOUSE which given it is written normally, the best assumption I can make is that it was due to the coin being under a piece of paper which was porous enough to allow the ink to pass through. Other ink marks appear on the obverse. Sam... is above the head and there are parallel lines by GI and something else (C?) by the ties. Basing House was a mansion that was besieged by Parliament three times in the Civil War, the final successful attempt at its capture came in the siege of August-October 1645. There's a Wiki page here. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Basing_House If the above is true, it therefore seems likely that this coin was once in the possession of someone doing research or writing an article about the siege, but no numismatic paper springs to mind.
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