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Ebay's Worst Offerings

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7 hours ago, jelida said:

Oh, and the second suspicious bidder on many of these coins now has feedback of 112. If you look, you’ll see what I mean.

Jerry

How is it possible to get a feedback higher than 100% ???

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2 minutes ago, Peckris 2 said:

How is it possible to get a feedback higher than 100% ???

112 is the number of ‘feedbacks’ he had received, not percentage positive, which is a different matter. If you look at an individual, it is his feedback total you see beside his id, not percentage but you can look into greater detail on his feedback page including percentages. My Ebay feedback is nearing 2000, for example. And 100% positive.

Jerry

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On 6/7/2020 at 9:35 PM, jelida said:

112 is the number of ‘feedbacks’ he had received, not percentage positive, which is a different matter. If you look at an individual, it is his feedback total you see beside his id, not percentage but you can look into greater detail on his feedback page including percentages. My Ebay feedback is nearing 2000, for example. And 100% positive.

Jerry

But it actually gives it as a % - e.g. "99.9% positive feedback"

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14 minutes ago, Peckris 2 said:

But it actually gives it as a % - e.g. "99.9% positive feedback"

What Jerry is referring to is the number of feedbacks showing for given bidders, as per the screenshot below, which is from the auction in question. You can see that the winning bidder had no feedback, possibly implying that it's an e bay account set up specifically for shill bidding. Obviously there's no hard evidence to definitively prove it, but that is the suspicion. Conversely, the previous bidder had a feedback score of 250 implying that they were an established respectable e bayer. 

The percentage of positive feedback is the total number of positive feedbacks given by buyers/total number of feedbacks, given to that seller. So if somebody had 1000 feedbacks, 999 of which were positive, and one negative, their positive feedback would indeed be 99.9%.      

bidders.PNG

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You can have some fun here if you want the coin. Bid consistently to a given level that you would be willing to pay. When shilled and subsequently relisted, go to the same level. Repeat until the vendor gets fed up and lets you have it. That's what I did with the 1718 silver halfpenny. I consistently bid £10 above my max in the room at Baldwin's where I was the underbidder, leaving the owner to repeatedly outbid me. After a few listings, he gave up trying and let me have it at my max, leaving him to absorb a bit of a loss on the buyer's premium and me paying less than I would have done if I bought it in the room. :)  He bought it speculatively hoping for a profit, so a small loss was all part of the game.

Doubles all round.

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So- if someone sells a coin to himself, doesn't he pay Ebay for the privilege?

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4 minutes ago, blakeyboy said:

 

So- if someone sells a coin to himself, doesn't he pay Ebay for the privilege?

I think Ebay take a cut if you pull a listing when bids have already been placed, but a non-paying bidder means you can cancel the order and get fees refunded if unwilling to sell. Or if fed up as in my case, let the underbidder take it on a second offer. Usually I will reject a second offer on principle as I resent being taken for a ride, but on occasion it can be worth it.

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17 hours ago, Rob said:

You can have some fun here if you want the coin. Bid consistently to a given level that you would be willing to pay. When shilled and subsequently relisted, go to the same level. Repeat until the vendor gets fed up and lets you have it. That's what I did with the 1718 silver halfpenny. I consistently bid £10 above my max in the room at Baldwin's where I was the underbidder, leaving the owner to repeatedly outbid me. After a few listings, he gave up trying and let me have it at my max, leaving him to absorb a bit of a loss on the buyer's premium and me paying less than I would have done if I bought it in the room. :)  He bought it speculatively hoping for a profit, so a small loss was all part of the game.

How did you know it was the same coin/seller?

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2 hours ago, Peckris 2 said:

How did you know it was the same coin/seller?

First bit is easy as it is the Peck coin which had been languishing in the dungeon since the Noble sale in 1973 - see below.

It was listed on eBay within a couple days of the Baldwin sale in May 2006 as a BIN for £800, he having paid £360 hammer for it. I finally bought it in August. It came from a seller that always had bids on his coins (including this one) from a couple of dodgy bidders (tee2459 & matthews9289) with a combined feedback of 1. It transpired that he lived three miles up the road. Small world.

c1295-P778 1718 silver halfpenny.jpg

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That is a real shame, there was some nice tokens there 😪

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Someone inadvertently left detail on the coin?

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This vendor has had a box of coins given to him by his mum, mostly genuine but low grade but it seems his mum also collected modern Chinese replicas, and even battered and toned some for her collection. Inspirational!

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/1843-Victoria-Copper-Penny/164249753649?hash=item263e0c5831:g:xCYAAOSwBDle6pMz

Jerry

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20 minutes ago, jelida said:

This vendor has had a box of coins given to him by his mum, mostly genuine but low grade but it seems his mum also collected modern Chinese replicas, and even battered and toned some for her collection. Inspirational!

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/1843-Victoria-Copper-Penny/164249753649?hash=item263e0c5831:g:xCYAAOSwBDle6pMz

Jerry

Pfff, Mum's sure aren't what they used to be🙁

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A fake 1871 penny being touted as the real thing - link

In a box of things his Mum gave him, apparently........ 

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14 minutes ago, 1949threepence said:

A fake 1871 penny being touted as the real thing - link

In a box of things his Mum gave him, apparently........ 

I don't think £25 is a lot for a BU 1871 space filler - especially as the repro is scarily realistic.

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10 minutes ago, Peckris 2 said:

I don't think £25 is a lot for a BU 1871 space filler - especially as the repro is scarily realistic.

Pretty sure you can buy these out of China for around two pounds each...AliExpress might be worth checking....

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29 minutes ago, Peckris 2 said:

I don't think £25 is a lot for a BU 1871 space filler - especially as the repro is scarily realistic.

Yes, it is good and would definitely fool some. 

A little work on convexing the shield and improving the lighthouse detail would probably have it fooling many more. 

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6 hours ago, Peckris 2 said:

I don't think £25 is a lot for a BU 1871 space filler - especially as the repro is scarily realistic.

It's £25 less you've got to spend on the real thing. :angry:

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24 minutes ago, Rob said:

Most of Science-Kenneth's coins seem to have had similar 'treatment'. 😎

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/1723-GEORGE-I-Shilling-In-Superb-UNC-condition-really-needs-to-be-seen/233620251762?hash=item3664da2472:g:pQIAAOSwrHNe59YG

Such a shame, if genuine as there are some nice examples in there.

 

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Posted (edited)
8 hours ago, Rob said:

Assuming the holder is genuine, that might just be dipped. For some reason, dipping (and 'conservation') isn't considered cleaning by the TPGs.

To be fair, most dealers don't consider dipping as cleaning either. You are one of very few that mention dipping in the description.

Edited by Sword

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