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bhx7

clogs, die faults, et al.

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Here is a clogged die with more missing waves. A 1937 Penny with the horizon missing to the left of the lighthouse and waves also absent.  Similarly on the rhs near the rim. I am still experimenting with the photography and will do better next time!

Regard,

Dave

IMG_2263b.jpg

IMG_2260.JPG

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That is a particularly nice example of a 'missing waves' penny.

Edited by jelida

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6 hours ago, jelida said:

That is a particularly nice example of a 'missing waves' penny.

Thanks, I saw it on eBay for £12 last year and took a punt as, whilst the picture was small, it looked different and was described as prooflike.  I can't decide if it is a proof, the fields do have a mirror like finish, but it was a nice find.  I had been meaning to post it for a while.  Here is the eBay picture.

162168085155_1.jpg

Edited by whitedb
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Just got a load of half pennies and came across a couple of interesting mint errors. The coins aren't brilliant but the errors are nice examples. The first is a George VI Off Strike.

1944 minet error half penny 2.jpg

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This is the second a Elizabeth II 1959 half penny with lamination error.

1959 Half penny with lamination error 1.jpg

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Whitedb - that is indeed a very attractive penny. Kind of looks a bit like a matte, though think it not.

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Here is my latest error penny. A 1901 with flaws to both sides. Sorry for the pics but my digital microscope gave up the ghost and has been filed in the B1N. Waiting on a new one arriving very soon.

1901 Flan Error Penny.jpg

1901 Penny Error.jpg

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Not British but a nice lamination flaw on this Swedish 2 öre:

Sweden 2 ore 1877 (7).jpg

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Personally I find errors to be really interesting as each one has its own little story of how it came about! Does anybody know what has caused this particular error on my 1927 penny?

33551273171_578202a418_b.jpg33551273521_ca4557db41_b.jpg

 

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When the sheet is produced you sometimes get material or air trapped inside the ingot as it cools. The metal crystallises at the inner surface of the inclusion. As it is rolled progressively thinner these inclusions can become exposed. What you have there is a couple of flaws arising from the trapped air.

Attached is an example where you can see the inclusion and crystallised metal to good effect.

01311.jpg

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Just passing by and saw this topic. Thought my 1964 6d might be relevant. The clog is obvious, but there are no signs that the "I" has been filed away, so I think it's a genuine die clog, and a 'ghost' of the I remains. (Would be fascinated to know if there are any more out there?)

1964 6d close-up.jpg

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On 2017-4-11 at 11:26 AM, Peckris said:

Just passing by and saw this topic. Thought my 1964 6d might be relevant. The clog is obvious, but there are no signs that the "I" has been filed away, so I think it's a genuine die clog, and a 'ghost' of the I remains. (Would be fascinated to know if there are any more out there?)

1964 6d close-up.jpg

Very nice.

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Hi Guys

Need a bit help. Is this a genuine brockage or is it something else...

Unusual 2p.jpg

Unusual 2p.jpg

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16 hours ago, bhx7 said:

Hi Guys

Need a bit help. Is this a genuine brockage or is it something else...

 

Hey Brian,

Brockage should always be a mirrored image of whatever design is on the other side, from the pictures it looks like someone has stuck a genuine brockage onto a normal 2p. Can you see any seams anywhere? The different colouring on both sides also makes me think this.

Is the reversed side in relief or is it just a trick of the photo? Should be incuse.

Edit: Must be a trick, because all of a sudden I see it incuse now!

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Think its incuse Matt but haven't actually had it in hand yet. Its a friends who isn't a coin collector. I had suspicions that there was something wrong especially with the differing colour and also having a standard obverse as I hadn't seen this before and couldn't find it on any pages. 

Edited by bhx7

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Looks to be a copper seam around the reverse on both. Machined? But can't explain the imagery of the reverse.

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My friend just dropped the coin off and as soon as he placed it into my hands I knew exactly what had happened. It is a hollowed out two pence which someone has then filled with a resin or putty of sorts and then imprinted with the reverse of another two pence. Why they have done it is up for debate but my friend said it has been in his penny/coin Jar since the mid seventies. We come from an industrial town so maybe one of the workmen got bored one day and made it up on a lathe. So just a curio nothing else. 

Edited by bhx7
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On 3/27/2017 at 4:29 PM, Rob said:

When the sheet is produced you sometimes get material or air trapped inside the ingot as it cools. The metal crystallises at the inner surface of the inclusion. As it is rolled progressively thinner these inclusions can become exposed. What you have there is a couple of flaws arising from the trapped air.

Attached is an example where you can see the inclusion and crystallised metal to good effect.

01311.jpg

Is this another similar fault? I don't think it's post mint.

DSCF9253.JPG

DSCF9254.JPG

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