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Generic Lad

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Everything posted by Generic Lad

  1. The main problem with details grades (especially if bought sight unseen!) is that the same descriptor can mean entirely different things. "Improperly Cleaned" can mean anything from you can barely see the coin due to the hairlines or that there are slight marks that indicate that the coin had been cleaned at some point in the past. Naturally there's a world of difference between the two coins and of course the grade of "Improperly Cleaned" means there must possibly be "Properly Cleaned" leaving it up to the grader at NGC to determine it. I really don't understand why TPGers are so popular over here in the US since they seem to do more harm than good.
  2. Generic Lad

    Ebay's Worst Offerings

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/1861-British-One-1-Penny-Coin-in-Well-Circulated-Condition-/250914971789?pt=US_World_Coins&hash=item3a6bb2a08d I'll just leave this here with no comment...
  3. I don't know how popular it is over in the UK, but over here in the US Craigslist is fairly popular to sell coins and since you sell things to fellow collectors you get very close to retail prices. For US junk silver I can usually get 95-105% of spot for even 40% halves.
  4. Generic Lad

    Help needed with unknown coins.

    http://www.wildwinds.com/coins/greece/thrace/istros/i.html ^Pretty sure that's your coin http://www.wildwinds.com/coins/greece/thrace/istros/t.html ^that link might help a bit more (same info, just with images displayed and not just text)
  5. I'd only get them if they were selling at or below scrap price. Not really all that interesting to me though I would like to pick up the 5p one, I've already got the 2 silver proof set of that.
  6. Anyone ever look at bullion shops for rare varieties/high grade? I've got a few that will keep anything British, foreign, or interesting out for me and I've gotten some scarce coins (nothing scarce British wise but have gotten a few key date central/south American coins) along with a large tin filled with Victorian bronze that I paid scrap copper price for. Anyone else do the same thing? I'd imagine it would be fairly easy to find scarce varieties being sold for melt.
  7. Generic Lad

    Ebay's Worst Offerings

    Yep, eBay has gone downhill recently, first requiring slabbed coins which makes bargains nearly impossible to find with US coins because a slabbed coin instantly adds $10-30 to a coin's price. Now the redesign and the wildcard searches... However, there doesn't seem to be any other good auction site out there that doesn't charge absurd fees for buyers (like Proxibid does!) and has a decent selection of coins (like every other auction site). eBay also makes international transactions relatively painless, something that's nice because buying from someone in the UK or in Denmark is just as easy as buying from someone in the states.
  8. Generic Lad

    1887 jubilee set

    Here's one on eBay, that includes a picture of the case. There's no guarantee (without provenance) that all the coins were originally part of the same set, but look for consistent toning. http://compare.ebay.co.uk/like/380489341246?var=lv&ltyp=AllFixedPriceItemTypes&var=sbar&cbt=y (I hope you can see that ok - when I first saw it you could switch between the pictures which were normal-looking not all squashed up like they are from that link. If it looks funny, try one of the other sets linked below it, then do a "go back" - it should correct itself). Are you sure that's the original case? Because it said at the bottom its in a modern case. Granted, I know nothing about Victorian proof sets so it could be the original since I've got no clue what an original one looks like
  9. Generic Lad

    What do you reckon to this ebay seller?

    All the ones I see for sale and on recent sales history look polished and have classic damage from cleaning/polishing.
  10. Is that a rare date, scott? (I know next to nothing about foreign, I'm afraid). Yes, I also wonder. Also what are the better dates to look for in melt/cu-ni bins? I know for US coins the key dates are: Wheat Cents: 1909-S (With or without VDB) 1914-D 1922 (no mintmark) 1931-S And of course the 1943 copper penny! Jefferson Nickels 1942-1945 with a large P, D or S over the Monticello on the reverse are 35% silver and worth about $1.75 in melt 1939-D 1950-D Mercury Dimes (all are silver) 1916-D 1921 1921-D 1926-S 1931-S Washington Quarters ('64 and prior are silver) 1932-D 1932-S Granted, there are numerous varieties (re-punched mintmarks, doubled dies, etc.) and many more scarce dates for the earlier coins, but your chances of seeing decent Barber (or Seated, or Bust!) coins in the junk/melt bin are rather small.
  11. Year - its a group A but you'll have to find any die match yourself Its posted and on its way! Didn't realise it was from my ebay sale list untill yesterday Thanks!
  12. Generic Lad

    1775 Halfpenny

    Yep, stick something on there about that it could have circulated in the colonies and say that it was dated the year of the start of the American Revolution and you have an instant $30-40+
  13. Picked this up today on eBay my first non-regal "silver". Look familiar Seuk?
  14. Generic Lad

    Hello, New here !

    Not much for the US coins, your Ike dollar is worth $1 and the proof set might be worth $5-6 (perhaps up to $10 if they are deep, ultra, cameo proofs with frosted designs and mirror like fields) but US proof sets have next to no demand, even over here in the US. I've heard stories of dealers paying less than face value for some of them!
  15. That's interesting. The coins still featured the fasces in 1945 . I'd imagine everyone knew what it was in 1945 - certainly Mussolini used it liberally, not to mention the half dozen other fascist states that were falling or had fallen, by then. But they'd switched it for a torch by 1964... I don't remember reading that the fasces ever really carrying a negative connotation on the Mercury dime despite its connection to fascism. I suppose since its been on the dime since 1916 that people just got used to it, whereas if they had introduced it during wartime it no doubt would have gotten more attention! The dime was redesigned in 1946 to honor president (dictator for life?) FDR who had recently died. On the other hand, poor John Sinnock got a lot of press for putting his initials on the dime because people thought a Soviet agent at the mint had put those initials, JS for Joseph Stalin. So when he designed his next coin, the Franklin Half Dollar he used his full initials (JRS) and still rumors persisted that it was Stalin's initials (despite Stalin's middle name being Vissarionovich!). Similarly, Gilroy Robert's stylized signature on the Kennedy Half Dollar was taken by the paranoid American public to be a hammer and a sickle (it does resemble it vaguely). I guess during the Cold War Americans were expecting Soviet agents at the mint putting secret designs in the new coinage!
  16. What about the bicenntial quarter? got one of them as well, probably from a roll. Extremely common. They made over a billion of them. For Bicentennials (quarter, dollar, half dollar) the only ones with value over face are the proof/silver uncirculated ones. You can tell this because they have an "S" mintmark. For US coins, there aren't many true rarities after 1955. You've got a few condition rarities but that's about it, the silver coins are worth silver scrap (1964 and prior halves, quarters and dimes are all 90% silver, 1965-1970 halves are 40% silver) but the rest of the intended for circulation stuff is really only worth anything in high grade. There are a couple of varieties (1970 no S proof dime) that are worth quite a bit but most of those there are only a handful known. However, with US coins there are varieties/rarities aplenty when you go back a couple more years. For example the 1955 doubled-die penny, the 1942/1 Mercury dime, the 1943 pennies struck on copper planchets, etc. are all truly scarce coins and command big bucks. If you really want to get into collecting minor varieties, pick up some Morgan dollars and look for VAM varieties. The Morgan dollar is essentially America's bun head penny in that there are so many documented varieties with near date, far dates, die breaks, etc. some which are so tiny that no one notices to others that can turn a $40 coin into a $400 coin. I asked about them. unfortunatly (for me) he sold all of them at a fair). he also didn't have any 1966 pennys except a few in the scrap which were YUCKY Yeah, cheap and fun US coins to collect are: Mercury dimes (expect to pay $4-7 for one in AU-low uncirculated grades, or $2.50 (silver scrap) for a common date in circulated grade) Wheat pennies (I don't particularly like them, but common dates can be found circulated for 3-50 cents, or $1-2 in BU) The entire Jefferson nickel collection can be bought in circulated grade for about 10-20 cents per coin (most can be found in change over here in the US, but naturally if you're not in the US you'll have to pay over face) except for a couple key dates (like the 1950-D) and the 35% silver war nickels (1942-1945) which sell for about $2 in silver scrap. Buffalo nickels can be found for cheap, especially if they have no date, the date wears off very quickly but can be chemically restored by soaking in various solutions. This will naturally damage the coin, but it can be a fun treasure hunt and a cheap collection since dateless buffaloes sell for little more than 7-10 cents. If you just want a type set, you can find a proof set (before 1999 will be the cheapest since 1999 started the state quarters program and so they have more coins and therefore are more expensive) with some searching you can find some with excellent cameo contrast and frosting. Most modern commemoratives trade near silver melt. Also, you might want to grab a copy of the Red Book for US coins (see http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/offer-listing/1582381887/ref=tmm_hrd_used_olp_sr?ie=UTF8&condition=used for an example), its a pretty useful reference and if nothing else it gives you nice pictures of the coins. For an older version (pictures and such will still be there, prices will be slightly off) you can pick one up for essentially just shipping.
  17. What about the bicenntial quarter? got one of them as well, probably from a roll. Extremely common. They made over a billion of them. For Bicentennials (quarter, dollar, half dollar) the only ones with value over face are the proof/silver uncirculated ones. You can tell this because they have an "S" mintmark. For US coins, there aren't many true rarities after 1955. You've got a few condition rarities but that's about it, the silver coins are worth silver scrap (1964 and prior halves, quarters and dimes are all 90% silver, 1965-1970 halves are 40% silver) but the rest of the intended for circulation stuff is really only worth anything in high grade. There are a couple of varieties (1970 no S proof dime) that are worth quite a bit but most of those there are only a handful known. However, with US coins there are varieties/rarities aplenty when you go back a couple more years. For example the 1955 doubled-die penny, the 1942/1 Mercury dime, the 1943 pennies struck on copper planchets, etc. are all truly scarce coins and command big bucks. If you really want to get into collecting minor varieties, pick up some Morgan dollars and look for VAM varieties. The Morgan dollar is essentially America's bun head penny in that there are so many documented varieties with near date, far dates, die breaks, etc. some which are so tiny that no one notices to others that can turn a $40 coin into a $400 coin.
  18. The 1983 US quarters are a bit confusing. You find them in change all the time here, but they are rather scarce in mint state (BU/FDC) because the US Mint for some reason didn't release any mint sets in 1983 meaning that any mint state coins have to be found from circulation or original rolls. Since roll saving had not paid off well for collectors since the end of silver in US coins, most collectors were busy assembling proof sets or accumulating the commemorative coins that the US Mint was releasing for the Olympics, the first commemorative coins released since the 1950s. This ends up with a coin that is by no means scarce (there were over 600 million minted!) but is hard to find in BU/FDC condition. http://www.ngccoin.com/news/viewarticle.aspx?IDArticle=572 is a good read about 1983 quarters.
  19. Generic Lad

    Ebay's Worst Offerings

    Indeed. And £200 for it. Bizarre! Daniel Carr's stuff is actually pretty collectable. He's designed a couple of quarters for the US mint (Rhode Island and New York I believe) and acquired an old coinage press from the Denver Mint and has been producing coins of his own design on it and a lot of "what if" coins such as a 1964 Franklin Half Dollar, and a 1964-D Peace Dollar (the US mint struck some Peace Dollars in '64 but melted them all back down). They're high quality strikes over a coin from that period and while they often sell for more than what I think they're worth (I'd spend like... $2-3 over melt for them) I must say I enjoy his parody state quarters! http://www.dc-coin.com/parodystatequartersetc.aspx
  20. I think it would be quite easy to cherrypick sovereigns if you had the budget for it. The other day I was at a coin shop and they had a 1911 sovereign and I asked what the mintmark was on it and the owner's response was "they've got mintmarks on these things!?" turned out to be a Sydney mint and therefore not worth that much more than melt, but I can easily see most US coin/bullion dealers sticking all sovereigns regardless of condition/year (except for perhaps Victorian/Gregorian issues) in the scrap bin. I have little doubt that with quite a bit of searching and a good powered loupe you could quite possibly find a 1920-S sovereign selling for bullion in the US. Of course the situation is going to be different in the UK, but over here sovereigns (and half sovereigns) go for little premium over melt, especially when compared to the coins that are in demand, Krugerrands, gold eagles, maple leafs, etc. Of course, with the bullion value alone of a sovereign over $400 right now, it certainly won't be the cheapest coin series to collect!
  21. Generic Lad

    Fake in an NGC Slab!

    It is quite disappointing to see this, especially since it seems like TPGers are the norm for any coin ~$50+ here in the US, I even know of a dealer who sells all of his ancient coins slabbed by NGC, despite the fact that the coins (although not junk late Roman bronzes) aren't exactly rare or unusual. The ads in every numismatic magazine seem to be offering PCGS slabbed this, NGC slabbed that, in fact, they've started submitting bulk "monster boxes" of silver eagles to TPGers and selling the "perfect" MS-70s for a huge markup. But adding to the problem of "grade inflation" and fake slabs we now have fake coins getting slabbed as genuine when they are obviously cast copies.
  22. How on earth does the 'middle man' make any kind of profit? Considering the banks wouldn't be paying more than face value for coins they are handing over to the public at face value. They charge the bank fees to drop off coin and to pick it up, so in essence the bank does pay more than face value for most of the coins, but since over here unless you're a collector or a business the chances of you getting boxes and boxes of coin at a time are slim and so its worth the few extra bucks to the bank because they make that money back fairly easily. Different banks in different areas might do things differently, but around here: 1) The bank orders the boxes and pays a small fee per box (boxes are $25 in cents, $100 in nickels, $250 in dimes, $500 in quarters, $500 in halves and I think $1000 in dollars but everyone hates the dollar coin so boxes rarely get ordered) 2) The bank gives out the boxes (at FV) to businesses/some collectors or breaks open the rolls and sells them or gives back a few coins in change 3) When customers bring in loose coin it is ran through a machine that separates the denomination and then puts it in bags (the bags are different depending on the bank but are usually like $50 in cents, $100 in nickels, $500 in dimes, $500 in quarters, $1000 in halves) these bags are then taken by the coin supply company (for a fee) and then ran through their machines, credit the bank's account and then are used later to roll and box up coins.
  23. I'd have to say that chances are that most of the coins in a mint bag should be of the same variety. However, at least in the US, banks don't get coins directly from the mint, rather they use a supplier that buys the coins from the mint (usually an armored car company such as Brinks or Dunbar) and then mixes the bags together to fill rolls and boxes. This does mean that its quite possible to get solid boxes/rolls of a single year (and mint) but you aren't guaranteed by any stretch to get the same variety because most likely multiple bags are being mixed in. However, geography does play a bit in finding rare varieties, as evidenced by certain coins that were once concentrated in a single area. For example I think nearly all examples of the 1955 doubled die cent were found in and around New England and especially in cigarette vending machines.
  24. Thanks! And yeah, I figured it was Charles I, don't know why I said it was Charles II It will be my first hammered shilling and most likely going to use it as a pocket piece
  25. Bought this worn/clipped Charles II Shilling for silver scrap I know its not worth much (anything) numismatically and is clipped/worn, but its more interesting to me than getting something boring like a 1964 Kennedy Half Dollar for the same amount of silver.
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