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I have to believe there are some other beer fans out there... rather than dive into the obvious category of beer types, thought I would ask about the vessel. Now I know there are certain glasses for certain beers (theoretically), and maybe it is my beer preference talking through tangible objects.. but I lean towards (1) 'Nonic Pint' and (2) 'Willi Becher'... I don't think I can make a poll to simply tally total votes given these options, but it would be interesting to see the results

Glasses.png.8a3ce5588f61692123019bfc0c1df46d.png

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I don't drink much beer these days, but when I do I still favour the traditional Dimpled Mug. The first of the two Mugs looks OK too.

It is many years since I tried a Yard!

 

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Always a dimpled Mug - the rest are for flowers only.

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A shaker pint for me, but if push came to shove I'd drink a real ale from any of them.

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Any publican will tell you that people who prefer a dimple pint or "jug" never pick it up by the handle. It's always used, handle opposite mouth and with the first three fingers poking through. So why not use a straight glass, is it the weight?

Also that which is described as a shaker, a term I have never encountered, is more commonly known as a sleever. More specifically, a cider sleever.

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I had no idea that the dimple pint almost went extinct: https://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-27188915

1 hour ago, bagerap said:

Any publican will tell you that people who prefer a dimple pint or "jug" never pick it up by the handle.

Researching for fun, I could not find any instructions on proper use of a dimple pint - but it was mentioned that using the handle was designed to keep the beer cooler longer (which makes sense I suppose with heat transfer from the hand). This is assuming the beer is hanging around long enough to really warm up I suppose

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Give me the boot , LOL

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In my local I have my Pewter tankard but if playing away from home then it's a Nonic Pint.

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3 hours ago, bagerap said:

Any publican will tell you that people who prefer a dimple pint or "jug" never pick it up by the handle. It's always used, handle opposite mouth and with the first three fingers poking through. So why not use a straight glass, is it the weight?

Also that which is described as a shaker, a term I have never encountered, is more commonly known as a sleever. More specifically, a cider sleever.

Ah, but even if you don't use the handles as such, the fact that your fingers are tucked through it gives you extra security against dropping it as your coordination falters later in the evening...

 

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The other benefit of the dimpled mug is that, with the general preference for straight glasses nowadays, it's easier to find your beer amongst all the others when you forget where you left it.

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The bottom line is, however it is served, it is good for what "ALES" you.........

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The dimpled and nonic glasses were the 2 commonest a s I recall. However the shaker (yes, SLEEVER or just SLEEVE!) was also featured.

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I drink beer infrequently these day but I prefer glasses that are simple and unpretentious. Pint glasses and Weizen-shaped are for me. 

But I do like to use different wine glasses for red, white, dessert, sparkling or spirits...

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i don't drink at all these days, but when I did, it was nearly always a dimpled mug for beer. 

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I am an Alchoholic although not had a drink at all for over four years ,i have never had a pint in one of those dimple things but have probably drank out of everyother glass in the picture.

I think that dimple one is maybe an old mans glass 😃

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9 hours ago, Sleepy said:

In my local I have my Pewter tankard 

I got some of these glass-bottom pewter tankards for my friend and his groomsmen as a part of his sending off. Again my astute research skills looking at Wikipedia say the glass bottom was legend to be a way to (1) refuse the King's Shilling, or (2) see someone about to punch you. Imagine finding a nice GIII shilling in your mug? Less great would be the resulting conscription...

IMG-8776.JPG.84b45e579f6160d67b5836172a47093e.JPG IMG-8777.JPG.e24b3e9aa140c3717dae6343a20b7ec1.JPG

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I don't really have a preference. Whichever one it's served in is fine as long as I'm not getting beer in a brandy glass. Or brandy in a beer glass for that matter.

I used to have a fair degree of competence at a yard of ale, although I think I'd struggle these days.:D

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My Grandfather had a pewter tankard with a glass bottom. On the glass bottom there was a picture of a man on the gallows and an inscription, "Good to the Last Drop."

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Shaker or Nonic pint. I already have four separate opportunities to try them out in the diary for next week, I’m going to be busy and a little unsteady.

Jerry

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20 hours ago, myt said:

I got some of these glass-bottom pewter tankards for my friend and his groomsmen as a part of his sending off. Again my astute research skills looking at Wikipedia say the glass bottom was legend to be a way to (1) refuse the King's Shilling, or (2) see someone about to punch you. Imagine finding a nice GIII shilling in your mug? Less great would be the resulting conscription...

I have heard of those stories before. They are really nice stories but I think they are probably myths. I think the theory that an all glass tankard was too expensive, and glass bottoms enable drinkers to see check the clarity and quality of the beer is more likely to be true.

 

 

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37 minutes ago, Sword said:

I have heard of those stories before. They are really nice stories but I think they are probably myths. I think the theory that an all glass tankard was too expensive, and glass bottoms enable drinkers to see check the clarity and quality of the beer is more likely to be true.

Yes, Wiki suggests it's a myth. I like the idea of punters checking the quality of their ale.

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This was liberated from the base of a Georgian drinking vessel which had the glass broken nearly down to the base, so the original shape is moot. Judging by the grade (the reverse is pretty much as struck) it must have been made in 1731 or soon after. Also helpfully listed on ebay as a sixpence. Happy days :)

 

c1293-1731 shilling R& P.jpg

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Posted (edited)
4 hours ago, Sword said:

but I think they are probably myths.

I agree, it was more of a fun/relevant attempt to combine discussions of beer and numismatics 😄

Based on @Rob‘s post, I assume you acquired the glass? That is a cool way to add one to a collection. While cracked, any chance the glass was used one more time before liberating the coin? A neat notion to think you might have drank a beer from the same glass as someone almost 300 years ago

Edited by myt

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NEVER a dimpled mug.

 

EVER.

 

 'Traditional' ?

Invented just before WW11 to show off colour of new ales to promote them.

A _ghastly_ way to drink beer.  Always reminds me of the hideous Davenports adverts and Watneys keg.

 

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1 hour ago, blakeyboy said:

NEVER a dimpled mug.

 

EVER.

 

 'Traditional' ?

Invented just before WW11 to show off colour of new ales to promote them.

A _ghastly_ way to drink beer.  Always reminds me of the hideous Davenports adverts and Watneys keg.

 

They're not my favourite, but they're still an effective means to stop the beer falling through one's fingers. :lol:

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