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ozjohn

Possible Fake 1905 Halfcrown

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https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Edward-V11-A-UNC-1905-Half-Crown/265082338390?hash=item3db8237c56:g:YvoAAOSwxCVgR2La

This halfcrown has the wonky I in the QVI on the reverse that indicates it maybe a fake. What does everyone else think?. I hope know one is taken taken in by it.

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I am not knowledgeable on the specific identifiers, but I would agree a fake. To me the beard and hair look unnaturally strong.

 

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Definitely a wrong'un.  The hair and beard never look as prominent as that, even on an as struck example.

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The ear is a giveaway

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the link doesn't work

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Not working as a link but if you cut and paste into the address bar the item comes up fine - still there at auction with a starting price of £5k!

 

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That's all wrong.

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Must be someone who peruses this forum - it's been pulled.

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3 hours ago, Peckris 2 said:

Must be someone who peruses this forum - it's been pulled.

That was me Chris.

The owner believed it to be genuine and was distraught when told it is a modern repro. He paid genuine 1905 money for it some time ago on eBay and is now trying to get his money back. I'm told they're not being very helpful and so he's approached trading standards. I did suggest he sign up as a member here in case anyone would be able to help but he's having trouble registering. If anyone does have advice he could be messaged on eBay via the contact the seller link. I think his feedback profile attests to his fair dealing and his listing of a coin he paid a lot for believing it genuine. On being told it was fake he immediately cancelled the listing.

 

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Posted (edited)

That's a real shame. What a pity he didn't do more research especially as that's a hugely popular and therefore much faked rarity. I'll contact him with any advice I can offer.

Edited by Peckris 2
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23 hours ago, Peckris 2 said:

the link doesn't work

If you see them in plain text, highlight the text, right click and then click on "go to" which will have the web address in front of it. 

Of course these days, so many are using mobile devices, that "click", as by a mouse, only applies to desktop PC's and  some laptops.

As far as the fake halfcrown is concerned, it's very easy for both buyer and seller to have been totally duped. Dates/denominations such as the 1905 halfcrown and shilling are prime targets for fakery, so you've really got to know your stuff before buying one. Especially from the shark infested waters of e bay.   

   

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4 hours ago, 1949threepence said:

If you see them in plain text, highlight the text, right click and then click on "go to" which will have the web address in front of it.

I did better than that - I pasted the highlighted text into a new window but Google said it couldn't find the link.

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It's a indeed a very sad incident and I have a great deal of sympathy to the current owner. But the coin is so obviously a fake. It is simply very risky to spend thousands of pounds on the words of a stranger. 

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1 hour ago, Sword said:

It's a indeed a very sad incident and I have a great deal of sympathy to the current owner. But the coin is so obviously a fake. It is simply very risky to spend thousands of pounds on the words of a stranger. 

It's an obvious fake to us who have years of experience, but I can see how someone with little experience might be fooled as all the correct elements appear to be there. But yes, spending 000's without the necessary years of collecting and studying is not advised. Hopefully the current owner will join us here (anonymously) and get all the help and advice he needs.

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More importantly - who did he buy it from?

Prevention rather than cure....?

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29 minutes ago, blakeyboy said:

More importantly - who did he buy it from?

Prevention rather than cure....?

Indeed, how far back does the "chain of ignorance" go?

 

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1 hour ago, 1949threepence said:

Indeed, how far back does the "chain of ignorance" go?

Not that far, I suspect.  I think I'd stop at the last eBay seller.

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5 hours ago, Nick said:

Not that far, I suspect.  I think I'd stop at the last eBay seller.

I'm sure they'd all plead ignorance and "sold in good faith".

What I suspect may have happened is that somewhere, (maybe more than once), along the line, a buyer realised they'd been sold a lemon, and then decided to off load it as a legitimate item to get their money back. Proving that would be next to impossible, as it remains between that seller and their conscience, with absolutely no witnesses.    

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Posted (edited)

I’m wondering if this coin is a fake of a fake. Most posts point to the obverse of the coin not being right. Although when I first saw the coin I thought it didn’t look quite right it was the crooked I in the QVI in the garter on the reverse that convinced me it wasn’t kosher.I checked this against the illustration in the fakes post in these forums and on examination of the original photo of the fake in the fakes post looked much more convincing than the example in the EBay listing.

Edited by ozjohn
More info

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I do remember seeing that crooked I in QVI in an otherwise very convincing example. This example is not particularly convincing. I agree that it is strange that it shares the same telltale crooked I.

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