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Thanks, it's hard to be sure sometimes. :) 

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50 minutes ago, mrbadexample said:

Thanks, it's hard to be sure sometimes. :) 

Indeed....

And reinforces the difficulty of working from images...

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7 hours ago, mrbadexample said:

Can either of you tell me what eliminates obverse 2 please? :unsure: 

A hammer?

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26 minutes ago, copper123 said:

A hammer?

😄 Good one.

 

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1 hour ago, copper123 said:

A hammer?

Someone's had a go...:lol:

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All examples of 2+C that I have seen have the die crack evidence, through "A" of "VICTORIA"

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I thought we'd already agreed it was Obverse 5 (the dink in the forehead)?

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Obverse 5.

c1890-1861 halfpenny obv.5.JPG

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Could someone confirm my ID on this please. I think it's reverse L.

Gary kindly forwarded the Draycott articles, which is where I found the pointings. A of half to a tooth.

WP_20210428_20_10_44_Pro.jpg

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8 hours ago, Zo Arms said:

12 + L Freeman F322 ?

 

I concur. :)

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9 hours ago, mrbadexample said:

I concur. :)

Could be 11+L if you like. LOL !

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11 hours ago, mrbadexample said:

I concur. :)

Thank you for confirming for me. Means a lot.

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1 hour ago, Bernie said:

Could be 11+L if you like. LOL !

However....

I have neither the knowledge nor experience to be taken seriously so these are purely amateur observations.

Using Mal Lewendons photos in the thread '1874 half penny' 2015, the only concrete difference that I can spot is the pointing of the second T in Britt.

Obverse 11 shows it pointing smack bang to a tooth. On obverse 12 the tooth is slightly to the left and the upright noticeably takes in some of the adjacent gap.

Transfering this observation to the side by side obverses shown in Freeman, page 89, the difference can be seen with a shift of the eyes.

On my coin the T is smack bang. Obverse 11?

 

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Ive said this because I couldn't quite get the R pointings on my coin to match Mal's pointings for obverse 12.

Bob.

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3 hours ago, Bernie said:

Could be 11+L if you like. LOL !

I can't tell the difference! 

I only checked the reverse. :lol:

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On 4/28/2021 at 4:16 PM, Zo Arms said:

Could someone confirm my ID on this please. I think it's reverse L.

Gary kindly forwarded the Draycott articles, which is where I found the pointings. A of half to a tooth.

WP_20210428_20_10_44_Pro.jpg

From the posted images I would concur with your identification and assessment.

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Freeman gave it a rarity of R14. 251-500 existing. Given such a low number, would anyone care to hazard a ball park value please?

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19 minutes ago, Zo Arms said:

Freeman gave it a rarity of R14. 251-500 existing. Given such a low number, would anyone care to hazard a ball park value please?

I wouldn't, but could I just point out...

1. Freeman's rarity estimates (apart from the very very rare R17 or rarer, or the relatively common) should be taken with a pinch of salt. They're based a lot on a large withdrawal from circulation, but pre-1971, so anything R14-ish is not AS RARE in relation to scarce or common varieties which got melted

2. Values for varieties are extremely dependent on the collector base for them, i.e. popularity.

3. Current status, for which you need to do some research (have any been sold recently?)

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5 hours ago, Bernie said:

Could be 11+L if you like. LOL !

I'm sure it's obverse 11 - see my halfpenny website to get you more confused !

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18 minutes ago, Peckris 2 said:

I wouldn't, but could I just point out...

1. Freeman's rarity estimates (apart from the very very rare R17 or rarer, or the relatively common) should be taken with a pinch of salt. They're based a lot on a large withdrawal from circulation, but pre-1971, so anything R14-ish is not AS RARE in relation to scarce or common varieties which got melted

2. Values for varieties are extremely dependent on the collector base for them, i.e. popularity.

3. Current status, for which you need to do some research (have any been sold recently?)

An unfair question really. It's only worth what someone's prepared to pay on the day. London coins only had the one mentioned earlier in the thread, that wasn't one.

It came in a better class eBay lot, so only trying to equate the outlay.

I do believe I've joined the dark side. Half pennies for me.

Thanks Chris.

 

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On 4/30/2021 at 5:17 AM, Zo Arms said:

However....

I have neither the knowledge nor experience to be taken seriously so these are purely amateur observations.

Using Mal Lewendons photos in the thread '1874 half penny' 2015, the only concrete difference that I can spot is the pointing of the second T in Britt.

Obverse 11 shows it pointing smack bang to a tooth. On obverse 12 the tooth is slightly to the left and the upright noticeably takes in some of the adjacent gap.

Transfering this observation to the side by side obverses shown in Freeman, page 89, the difference can be seen with a shift of the eyes.

You might be on to something, though I think obverse 11 and 12 are probably the same more of less - I looked for any appreciable difference that wasn't a comparative and all I could notice was that some coins had the R of BRITT pointing below the serif of the I and some had it in line. Both types could be seen on coins that were supposed to be both 11 and 12.

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3 hours ago, Mr T said:

You might be on to something, though I think obverse 11 and 12 are probably the same more of less - I looked for any appreciable difference that wasn't a comparative and all I could notice was that some coins had the R of BRITT pointing below the serif of the I and some had it in line. Both types could be seen on coins that were supposed to be both 11 and 12.

As much as it would be very satisfying to take all the credit, I had a gander at Richard's Half penny site last night, for the first time.

He's of the view that the 2 F322's that he's seen, both bear obverse 11. So my discovery has already been discovered.

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Thought I'd found a 6 over 8 here as the die pairing is correct. Unfortunately it was just dirt but look at the die fill I initially missed. F274A 5+E

Screenshot_2021-06-20-20-34-01-960.jpg

Screenshot_2021-06-20-20-25-29-393.jpg

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