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Paulus

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1 minute ago, Unwilling Numismatist said:

She wasn't a looker was she :)

 

I agree, bordering on the ugly I'd say, a face only a mother could love. However, if the beauty of the monarch was high up on the list of selection criteria, there would be a lot of empty cabinets around😉

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Maybe all the would-be paramours didn't wear glasses, or ?skills? Oops, that is damn near sacrilegious....LOL

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12 hours ago, Rob said:

Things are a bit dead at the moment, so let's try to breathe a bit of life into this place.

P1163 Taylor restrike pattern halfpenny.

 

c1391-P1163 Taylor restrike 1797 halfpenny - Copy.jpg

Do we know why cartwheel halfpennies were never minted? Yet they were, the following year, for the IOM.

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1 hour ago, Unwilling Numismatist said:

She wasn't a looker was she :)

She hasn't been very unfortunate. 

"In fact, her skin had been scarred by smallpox in 1562, leaving her half bald and dependent on wigs and cosmetics. Her love of sweets and fear of dentists contributed to severe tooth decay and loss to such an extent that foreign ambassadors had a hard time understanding her speech." "The more Elizabeth's beauty faded, the more her courtiers praised it. Elizabeth was happy to play the part, but it is possible that in the last decade of her life she began to believe her own performance."

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52 minutes ago, Sword said:

She hasn't been very unfortunate. 

"In fact, her skin had been scarred by smallpox in 1562, leaving her half bald and dependent on wigs and cosmetics. Her love of sweets and fear of dentists contributed to severe tooth decay and loss to such an extent that foreign ambassadors had a hard time understanding her speech." "The more Elizabeth's beauty faded, the more her courtiers praised it. Elizabeth was happy to play the part, but it is possible that in the last decade of her life she began to believe her own performance."

Senility and fawning flunkies will do that - just look at our current batch of dictators - Trump, Putin, Kim, whatever the Chinese guy is called....

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6 hours ago, Peckris 2 said:

Do we know why cartwheel halfpennies were never minted? Yet they were, the following year, for the IOM.

No idea, but a guess would be the need for pennies far outweighed that for halfpennies [and farthings], the requirement for which could be considered already served by the numbers circulating, whether genuine or not. Another angle could be that the security edge wasn't sufficiently developed for a currency issue, bearing in mind there was no security edge on the pennies or twopences. Or maybe it was down to a shortage of copper given the quantities needed for ships' hulls.

The IOM being self determining could presumably issue what it liked. The head of state might have been Victoria, but the Tynwald passed the laws.

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Posted (edited)

Paddy, you left off Erdogan, Bolsonaro, Assad, and the wonderfully named Gurbanguly Berdimuhamedov.

Edited by blakeyboy
speling
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9 hours ago, Nonmortuus said:

1918-half-crown-cgs-80-5.jpg

Just out of interest, what grade was given by CGS. I always like to have a guess at these things. 78? 

The tone and lack of contact marks make the coin very appealing. 

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1 hour ago, Sword said:

Just out of interest, what grade was given by CGS. I always like to have a guess at these things. 78? 

The tone and lack of contact marks make the coin very appealing. 

Very nice. Not to degrade the coin at all but I wonder how a coin like this has an almost perfect top of the ear and slight weakness on the hair between the ear and eyebrow while others are well struck in this area but quite flat on the tip of the ear.. Overall a very nice coin and one I would like to own. I'll hazard a guess of CGS 85.

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2 hours ago, Rob said:

No idea, but a guess would be the need for pennies far outweighed that for halfpennies [and farthings], the requirement for which could be considered already served by the numbers circulating, whether genuine or not. Another angle could be that the security edge wasn't sufficiently developed for a currency issue, bearing in mind there was no security edge on the pennies or twopences. Or maybe it was down to a shortage of copper given the quantities needed for ships' hulls.

The IOM being self determining could presumably issue what it liked. The head of state might have been Victoria, but the Tynwald passed the laws.

I doubt Victoria would have had much influence in 1797, having not been born till 1819....

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18 minutes ago, Bronze & Copper Collector said:

I doubt Victoria would have had much influence in 1797, having not been born till 1819....

Oops, red face time. Not sure what I was thinking about there other than not the response. Silly sod. I'm as mad as the bloke on the obverse.

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5 minutes ago, Rob said:

Oops, red face time. Not sure what I was thinking about there other than not the response. Silly sod. I'm as mad as the bloke on the obverse.

I think we all understood your point though...

Interestingly enough, I don't think he went fully insane until circa 1810

 

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10 hours ago, Bronze & Copper Collector said:

I think we all understood your point though...

Interestingly enough, I don't think he went fully insane until circa 1810

 

I think that he was blind at the end too, so he never got to see his new coinage.

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It's just as well he didn't see the infamous Bull Head portrait then.

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14 hours ago, Sword said:

Just out of interest, what grade was given by CGS. I always like to have a guess at these things. 78? 

The tone and lack of contact marks make the coin very appealing. 

Hi Sword, its a CGS 80. I must say it looks much much better in hand.

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Posted (edited)

The coin already looks very appealing in the photo and and it has a particularly well struck obverse. The numerical grade does not often taken sufficient account of the strike or toning. I think it is a more desirable piece than what the grade would suggest, as everyone is after well struck examples. 

Edited by Sword
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If I had to chose, I think that Charles II would lead the way in the Portrait stakes, he cuts a dashing figure. And thank goodness for small mercy’s, no Hapsburg jaws.B99267EB-5319-4C28-A0F3-F3FFA8DBF8E0.thumb.jpeg.6ad9933ea7a1e57343ca3dda11d3f599.jpeg

 

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, Paulus said:

1912_hc_xx_01_sellers_the_coin_king.jpg

Very Nice. A difficult year for any grade. Here's my one it's NGC MS61 and similar in grade to your coin.

1912.jpg

Edited by ozjohn
More info.

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Here is my best example 1912 at the moment. CGS75

1912-hc.jpg

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12 hours ago, Nonmortuus said:

Here is my best example 1912 at the moment. CGS75

1912-hc.jpg

As I said a very hard year and difficult to obtain in a high grade. A very nice coin.

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On 6/16/2020 at 8:29 PM, Rob said:

No idea, but a guess would be the need for pennies far outweighed that for halfpennies [and farthings], the requirement for which could be considered already served by the numbers circulating, whether genuine or not. Another angle could be that the security edge wasn't sufficiently developed for a currency issue, bearing in mind there was no security edge on the pennies or twopences. Or maybe it was down to a shortage of copper given the quantities needed for ships' hulls.

The IOM being self determining could presumably issue what it liked. The head of state might have been Victoria, but the Tynwald passed the laws.

You've already been "had" over Victoria! However, the obverse of the IOM 1798 halfpennies is the same as the 1797 copper 2d and 1d. And the 'cartwheel' design is also the same.

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Posted (edited)

To add to the 1912 collection I have a NGC Au 58 halfcrown which has a gouge on the obverse by the A in halfcrown.

Clipboard 2.jpg

Edited by ozjohn
typo

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