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Yes thats what i believe it to be i recently sold a decent one to Dave craddock who wasnt familiar with it ,so assume there are not many of them.

Pete.

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Just incase anyone wants one he may still have it , having a look was on his list only a couple of weeks ago.

1854 4/4 ........EF traces of lustre £60

 

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On 10/15/2018 at 6:29 AM, PWA 1967 said:

Just incase anyone wants one he may still have it , having a look was on his list only a couple of weeks ago.

1854 4/4 ........EF traces of lustre £60

 

The power of the forum ..........He sold this Monday morning to a forum member 🙂

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….and here is a close up of the overdate on that coin. The 4/4 more convincing, with the front of the underneath 4 quite clear...………..as highlighted (red arrows)

1854 over 4.jpg

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When i first looked at one i am pretty sure its a 4 as only the plain 4  out of all the digits fits and is the most likely repair with a crosslet one.

Edited by PWA 1967

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On ‎9‎/‎9‎/‎2018 at 8:09 AM, PWA 1967 said:

1847-pattern-dnw-rev.jpg?w=564&h=558

Thought it better to show the picture of the reverse for anyone that might be interested as unrecorded.

I was having another good look at the pictures of this New type 1847 with no colons after REG, and noticed that instead of a gown with the elaborate lace neck line, which you find on all the other reverse Victorian copper types. This one has what looks like a Gorget breastplate , with the embossed head of Medusa set into the centre , its difficult to be sure though as it could be a chainmail neck piece with the embossed head of Medusa on a solid piece of metal set into the chainmail .  Small breastplates like this were used on armour going back as far as the Romans, and has been used for decoration on some military uniforms right up to the present day .   Pictured below is a Gorget worn be the German Military Police during the WW2, which I think looks remarkably similar to Britanniar's neck piece on this newly found type. :D

489074078_ww2Armybreastplate.thumb.jpg.72dc6afac8c7a27c6d2edd02d1fd8dae.jpg

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Was intrigued by the Freeman 189 (3 + B) penny, which is noted by him as R19. Found this really interesting article positing various theories about it. 

So probably F20 - unique

 

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33 minutes ago, 1949threepence said:

Was intrigued by the Freeman 189 (3 + B) penny, which is noted by him as R19. Found this really interesting article positing various theories about it. 

So probably F20 - unique

 

I actually wrote that article - glad you found it interesting.

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29 minutes ago, Mr T said:

I actually wrote that article - glad you found it interesting.

Certainly did, and thanks very much :)  

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Take a look at this ! I wish I was rich !

It makes your mouth water.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Rainbow-PCGS-MS-65-BU-1967-Great-Britain-1-2-Penny-Unc-Top-Grade-391/223267471542?hash=item33fbc740b6:g:ElAAAOSwEwhb7Orn

 

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Bernie,

More likely it's your eyes that are watering...

link

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On ‎11‎/‎30‎/‎2018 at 6:27 AM, terrysoldpennies said:

I was having another good look at the pictures of this New type 1847 with no colons after REG, and noticed that instead of a gown with the elaborate lace neck line, which you find on all the other reverse Victorian copper types. This one has what looks like a Gorget breastplate , with the embossed head of Medusa set into the centre , its difficult to be sure though as it could be a chainmail neck piece with the embossed head of Medusa on a solid piece of metal set into the chainmail .  Small breastplates like this were used on armour going back as far as the Romans, and has been used for decoration on some military uniforms right up to the present day .   Pictured below is a Gorget worn be the German Military Police during the WW2, which I think looks remarkably similar to Britanniar's neck piece on this newly found type. :D

489074078_ww2Armybreastplate.thumb.jpg.72dc6afac8c7a27c6d2edd02d1fd8dae.jpg

Similar items were given to trusted Aboriginals in the colonial days. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aboriginal_breastplate

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That smaller symbolic type Gorget shown in the picture you posted John was worn as part of cavalry officers uniforms throughout the 18th and 19th century :D

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That's correct. However they were bestowed on Aboriginals who were of merit.

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1909-f169-4-obv.jpg?w=300&h=2951909-f169-4-rev.jpg?w=300&h=294

 

1909 F169 The one that went unsold in the last LCA.

Edited by PWA 1967
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I'm referring directly to Page 426 of Peck, and specifically to BM1699 - an 1874H (Freeman 73). What is the general opinion on the "grained edge" referred to (as extremely rare) by Peck? Are these a myth? Or if they do exist, were they elaborately tooled, post minting? 

At the back of my mind I seem to remember that Freeman mentioned them in his 1970 edition, but dropped them for the 1985 one.    

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9 hours ago, 1949threepence said:

I'm referring directly to Page 426 of Peck, and specifically to BM1699 - an 1874H (Freeman 73). What is the general opinion on the "grained edge" referred to (as extremely rare) by Peck? Are these a myth? Or if they do exist, were they elaborately tooled, post minting? 

At the back of my mind I seem to remember that Freeman mentioned them in his 1970 edition, but dropped them for the 1985 one.    

I am sure i have read the edge was put on PM and therefore not intentional ,not done at the mint..

Although sorry Mike i cant point you to a reference as cant remember where i read it...... if i did ☺️

Edited by PWA 1967

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1 minute ago, PWA 1967 said:

I am sure i have read the edge was put on PM and therefore not intentional ,not done at the mint..

Although sorry Mike i cant point you to a reference as cant remember were i read it...... if i did ☺️

Thanks Pete. I vaguely recall reading the same at some point, but also can't remember where or when. Several years ago at least. 

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10 hours ago, 1949threepence said:

I'm referring directly to Page 426 of Peck, and specifically to BM1699 - an 1874H (Freeman 73). What is the general opinion on the "grained edge" referred to (as extremely rare) by Peck? Are these a myth? Or if they do exist, were they elaborately tooled, post minting? 

Interesting that Peck doesn't include an obverse type for this coin - a typo ?

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11 hours ago, 1949threepence said:

I'm referring directly to Page 426 of Peck, and specifically to BM1699 - an 1874H (Freeman 73). What is the general opinion on the "grained edge" referred to (as extremely rare) by Peck? Are these a myth? Or if they do exist, were they elaborately tooled, post minting? 

At the back of my mind I seem to remember that Freeman mentioned them in his 1970 edition, but dropped them for the 1985 one.    

Yes I remember in one of his books he decided they were done post-mint - must be the latest edition because I remember them being in the tallies in his first book.

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2 hours ago, Mr T said:

Yes I remember in one of his books he decided they were done post-mint - must be the latest edition because I remember them being in the tallies in his first book.

Excerpt from Freeman 1970 attached. He recorded it as F75

620381837_1874HF73grainededgepic_edited.jpg.0c01eca559a5fe229666d166ffd9fb69.jpg

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Yes it says in the Second edition of Freeman.

"Since the last edition was published the Royal Mint has obtained an electron microscope which enabled the conclusion to be reached that all Bronze with a grained edge had received them after leaving the mint "

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7 hours ago, secret santa said:

Interesting that Peck doesn't include an obverse type for this coin - a typo ?

Yes, I noticed that Richard. Curious.

7 hours ago, Mr T said:

Yes I remember in one of his books he decided they were done post-mint - must be the latest edition because I remember them being in the tallies in his first book.

 

4 hours ago, secret santa said:

Excerpt from Freeman 1970 attached. He recorded it as F75

620381837_1874HF73grainededgepic_edited.jpg.0c01eca559a5fe229666d166ffd9fb69.jpg

 

51 minutes ago, PWA 1967 said:

Yes it says in the Second edition of Freeman.

"Since the last edition was published the Royal Mint has obtained an electron microscope which enabled the conclusion to be reached that all Bronze with a grained edge had received them after leaving the mint "

Thanks Gents - very useful info and much appreciated. 

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