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Coin aquisition of the week.......

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On 8/5/2022 at 1:13 AM, azda said:

You’re not the only one, these Gillicks in higher end grades are fetching some serious money just now. A 1957 has sold for £1900 and there’s one in higher grade than 66

0215F8B1-84F2-4481-8E1C-F935C3E0E1FF.jpeg

😆 How much money do you need to have in the bank to not go to bed at night thinking "what the fuck have I done spending 2 and a half grand on a 1957 sovereign?" 

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Completely mental - any 1957-1968 sov is easy obtainable in AU for £400-420.  Only a so-called 'investor' would rather have one in MS66 than six different ones in AU, surely?   

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This is the type of crazy coin market that we now have on our hands. Lunacy to us? Yes indeed!

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17 hours ago, ozjohn said:

I can remember buying a sovereign back in the late 60's for GBP 8.00  That was in the days when you were not supposed to have sovereigns.

I remember when you had to apply for a licence to own gold, and I think there was a maximum number of sovs you were officially allowed to have?

I was talking about the late 90s though, when the price of gold dipped quite low and I was seriously tempted to buy some post-53 sovs. £55 was probably comparable with £8 in the 60s? Or not far out, I'd guess.

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6 hours ago, pokal02 said:

Completely mental - any 1957-1968 sov is easy obtainable in AU for £400-420.  Only a so-called 'investor' would rather have one in MS66 than six different ones in AU, surely?   

 

3 hours ago, VickySilver said:

This is the type of crazy coin market that we now have on our hands. Lunacy to us? Yes indeed!

That's fine for most of us isn't it? Let those people chase numbers and pay huge sums for them and we don't have to join in. I am happy as long as there is a supply of unslabbed coins and the grades like  MS63s etc can be picked up for reasonable prices. 

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41 minutes ago, Peckris 2 said:

I remember when you had to apply for a licence to own gold, and I think there was a maximum number of sovs you were officially allowed to have?

I just can't imagine there was a time that a licence was needed to own gold. Thank God those days are gone (hopefully for ever)

42 minutes ago, Peckris 2 said:

I was talking about the late 90s though, when the price of gold dipped quite low and I was seriously tempted to buy some post-53 sovs. £55 was probably comparable with £8 in the 60s? Or not far out, I'd guess.

You are very correct according to the BoE inflation calculator. I also remember the low price of sovs in the 80s and 90s and still occasionally wish I had got a few then.

182374620_temp2-Copy.jpg.5b5dac338d1e01190f642cc5bb16a40a.jpg

 

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Also posted in Ebay's Best Offerings

Labeled incorrectly as an 1897 High Tide, it is actually an 1897 Dot.

 

Screenshot_20220916-101049_NGC.jpg

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Sorry, but if there's a dot there I just can't see it. It should be obvious. Here's mine:

1755769344_1897pennyO.NEreverse.jpg.4e7d18643a9c33e86ab1741d5d3145fe.jpg

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59 minutes ago, Peckris 2 said:

Sorry, but if there's a dot there I just can't see it. It should be obvious. Here's mine:

1755769344_1897pennyO.NEreverse.jpg.4e7d18643a9c33e86ab1741d5d3145fe.jpg

It's there, I have 2 to compare it to myself.

Look inside circled area. I will grant that it is much easier to see in person under direct examination.

20220916_101303.jpg

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16 hours ago, Bronze & Copper Collector said:

Another view of the reverse and Dot.

Difficult to image through the plastic.

 

20220917_021400.jpg

Ah, NOW I can see it!

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Another type ticked off for me, I took a bit of a punt on this one but I'm more than happy!

1902-crown.jpg

Edited by Nonmortuus
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Patterns are not something I usually go for, but got to have at least 1 example, right?

1660_br_01_ref_02315_02_sellers_mh_coins_2400.png

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Yes I'd say so - but what denomination size is it?

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9 hours ago, Peckris 2 said:

Yes I'd say so - but what denomination size is it?

It's a restoration broad (20 shillings) by Thomas Simon

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2 hours ago, Paulus said:

It's a restoration broad (20 shillings) by Thomas Simon

Sovereign Rarities sold one in their last auction, and though describing it in the title as a silver pattern broad, went on to say that according to research from 1995 it it is now thought to be a medal.

https://auctions.sovr.co.uk/index.php?option=com_timed_auction&view=lot_detail&low_estimate=0&high_estimate=50000&keyword=&exclude_keyword=&sort_by=lot_number&image_filter=0&box_filter=0&paper_filter=0&export_issue=0&arr=0&auction_id=17&list_type=list_view&lots_per_page=18&page_no=1&lot_id=754421&search_type=&year=&month=&department_id=&cat_id=

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Yes, these 'patterns' are of unclear purpose and also appear in Medallic Illustrations as medals. In this case MIi 463/59. A lovely piece of Simon's work, either way

"59. Restoration. 1660. " Magna Opera Domini." Bust of Charles II., r., laureate, hair long, flowing over the shoulders, in armour with straps and lion's head on the shoulder, mantle, and medal. Leg. carolvs . ii . d . g . mag . br . fr . et . hi . rex. Underneath, s. (Thomas Simon.) Rev. Square shield of Great Britain and Ireland, crowned. Leg. magna . opera . domini . 1660. (The works of the Lord are great. — Psal. cxi. 2.) 1*15. Med. Hist, xxvii. 2. Ruding, PI. xxxiv. 2. MB. N. M. Bodley, M. Athole, M. Rare. This beautifully executed piece is the work of Thomas Simon. By some persons it is supposed to have been a pattern for a coin, but it was more probably a small medal struck upon the Restoration. It may be the piece mentioned in Simon's accounts, and for which £16 was charged. It is there termed a medal. (See Vertue, p. 89.) "

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On 9/26/2022 at 8:11 AM, Paulus said:

It's a restoration broad (20 shillings) by Thomas Simon

The date 1660 points more to a medal if it were 1662 or later I would agree with it being a pattern - a fine work anyway , really lovely.

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8 hours ago, TomGoodheart said:

Yes, these 'patterns' are of unclear purpose and also appear in Medallic Illustrations as medals. In this case MIi 463/59. A lovely piece of Simon's work, either way

"59. Restoration. 1660. " Magna Opera Domini." Bust of Charles II., r., laureate, hair long, flowing over the shoulders, in armour with straps and lion's head on the shoulder, mantle, and medal. Leg. carolvs . ii . d . g . mag . br . fr . et . hi . rex. Underneath, s. (Thomas Simon.) Rev. Square shield of Great Britain and Ireland, crowned. Leg. magna . opera . domini . 1660. (The works of the Lord are great. — Psal. cxi. 2.) 1*15. Med. Hist, xxvii. 2. Ruding, PI. xxxiv. 2. MB. N. M. Bodley, M. Athole, M. Rare. This beautifully executed piece is the work of Thomas Simon. By some persons it is supposed to have been a pattern for a coin, but it was more probably a small medal struck upon the Restoration. It may be the piece mentioned in Simon's accounts, and for which £16 was charged. It is there termed a medal. (See Vertue, p. 89.) "

£16 must have been a serious ammount of cash back then probably about a third of a years wages for an ord working man

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2 hours ago, copper123 said:

£16 must have been a serious ammount of cash back then probably about a third of a years wages for an ord working man

Presumably that was the charge for producing the piece? But as you say, a serious amount of money for the average person.

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On 9/27/2022 at 7:51 PM, copper123 said:

£16 must have been a serious amount of cash back then probably about a third of a years wages for an ord working man

117374358_1660-Copy.thumb.jpg.c177b0e56c95dc6ba258af658e8137a3.jpg

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How interesting - not sure what 4 quarters of wheat was but as it was probably the most usefull of the above products and would have been chosen by the most people given a choice .

Wheat was a staple at the time and as it was mostly cut by hand on small farms so it was in really terms very expensive compared to the machine cut wheat we have these days that is both cheap and plentyfull.

Cheese and butter were also  staples.

Edited by copper123

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