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Just a 1902 penny

47987EBF-A7CE-488F-8A0A-D0F247E794DC.png

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2 hours ago, pies said:

Just a 1902 penny

47987EBF-A7CE-488F-8A0A-D0F247E794DC.png

‘Just’ a very nice low tide, from the picture.

Jerry

 

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14 hours ago, pies said:

Just a 1902 penny

47987EBF-A7CE-488F-8A0A-D0F247E794DC.png

A lovely low tide👍

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I've had this one for a while and think it is a fairly good example as 1920 silver is hard to obtain in higher grades as I suspect people hoarded the sterling silver coins and spent the 50% silver ones.

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Yes i have been told that some really nice 1920 possibly struck first ,were done with a much higher silver content , better struck due to being softer metal and first strikes.

Although i also believe they are rare in high grade and the dealer who told me has only had a couple in 40/50 years.

Edited by PWA 1967

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5 hours ago, PWA 1967 said:

Yes i have been told that some really nice 1920 possibly struck first ,were done with a much higher silver content , better struck due to being softer metal and first strikes.

Although i also believe they are rare in high grade and the dealer who told me has only had a couple in 40/50 years.

ESC lists 2 varieties for the 1920 florin, 3765 with the portrait as in previous years and 3766 with the portrait "in lower relief". I must admit that I find it difficult to tell them apart, but I suspect that mine is 3765 and @ozjohn has 3766? Grateful for any input.

 

 

1920_OR.jpg

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No good asking me sorry as have not got a clue 😂 ,my point was any that are really well struck may well have a higher silver content.

Most especially the OBV are weak due to changes in the metal mix.

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1 hour ago, david.bordeaux said:

ESC lists 2 varieties for the 1920 florin, 3765 with the portrait as in previous years and 3766 with the portrait "in lower relief". I must admit that I find it difficult to tell them apart, but I suspect that mine is 3765 and @ozjohn has 3766? Grateful for any input.

A nice simple way to tell the two obverses apart is to look at the left leg of N in OMN.  Davies obverse 2 (earlier deeply engraved portrait) points to a tooth, obverse 3 (later shallower portrait) points to a space.

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So are all the 1920's definitely  50%?

It does seem odd if the mixture varied.

Does any one remember getting these, and a few later years, with a 'coppery' look to the obverse head?

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3 hours ago, blakeyboy said:

So are all the 1920's definitely  50%?

It does seem odd if the mixture varied.

Does any one remember getting these, and a few later years, with a 'coppery' look to the obverse head?

I’ve noticed the coppery look on some 1920 florins and halfcrowns with wear while others maintain their silver look and have wondered if some were struck in .925 silver. I did hear from somewhere that nickel from WW1 shell cases was added to the alloy that may account for that as nickel is sometimes used to whiten gold for white gold despite the fact that it can cause allergic reactions. As for shell cases being used as a source of nickel seems doubtful as they are made from brass.which is an alloy of copper and zinc.

 

6 hours ago, Nick said:

A nice simple way to tell the two obverses apart is to look at the left leg of N in OMN.  Davies obverse 2 (earlier deeply engraved portrait) points to a tooth, obverse 3 (later shallower portrait) points to a space.

Just looking at the coin I posted the LH leg of the N in  OMN seems to point towards a tooth.

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I would have to look it up again, but recall is that the RM "pickled" the 0.500 silver blanks from the 1920's (early 20's I seem to recall) prior to striking and so the surface metal was of higher silver percentage until worn off....

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That must have been where I saw the bit about the bullet cases  The following link shows the construction of a ,303 bullet where the projectile is made from lead and antimony with a cupronickel. jacket. .https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/.303_British#/media/File:Mk_VI_.303_cartridge_diagram_Treatise_on_Ammunition_1915.jpg

Edited by ozjohn
more info.

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Seems unusual that the projectile/business end would be used though....Henry rifle rounds cases listed as brass composition by Wikipedia.

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4 hours ago, VickySilver said:

Seems unusual that the projectile/business end would be used though....Henry rifle rounds cases listed as brass composition by Wikipedia.

Yes and only the jacket was of any use as most of the projectile was a lead alloy to increase its mass.

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On 2/17/2022 at 3:08 AM, VickySilver said:

I would have to look it up again, but recall is that the RM "pickled" the 0.500 silver blanks from the 1920's (early 20's I seem to recall) prior to striking and so the surface metal was of higher silver percentage until worn off....

Yes, that's true. Which is why UNC examples look silver but the more worn they become the more the copper shows through.

 

On 2/16/2022 at 6:27 AM, ozjohn said:

I've had this one for a while and think it is a fairly good example as 1920 silver is hard to obtain in higher grades as I suspect people hoarded the sterling silver coins and spent the 50% silver ones.

Yes, that's also true of the rest of that series. Though 1924-1926 are due even more to low mintages.

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From davidrj's collection. As you can understand I'm well pleased with this!

 

1056201090_1913penny2Aobverse.jpg.e7fc3f2e8147fe65e8b7817c06555225.jpg1086337325_1913penny2Areverse.jpg.b447f9696d24c546f364d0c875ab46a0.jpg

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On 2/17/2022 at 12:41 AM, Nick said:

A nice simple way to tell the two obverses apart is to look at the left leg of N in OMN.  Davies obverse 2 (earlier deeply engraved portrait) points to a tooth, obverse 3 (later shallower portrait) points to a space.

Another 1920 florin I have. It's  a NGC AU 58In this case the LH leg of the M of OMN seems to be pointing to a gap between the \teeth on the edge of the coin

img028.jpg

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The other indicator is OBV 2    i in Georgivs to gap    OBV 3   i in Georgivs to tooth.

Talking to people who know OBV 3 is a lot scarcer and harder to find.

 

1920florin-1m.jpg

1920florin-2m.jpg

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16 hours ago, PWA 1967 said:

The other indicator is OBV 2    i in Georgivs to gap    OBV 3   i in Georgivs to tooth.

Talking to people who know OBV 3 is a lot scarcer and harder to find.

 

1920florin-1m.jpg

1920florin-2m.jpg

I'm not sure why, but I find the difference between the two obverses harder to spot (at a glance)  on the florins than on the halfcrown and shilling

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A recent eBay purchase. Freeman F322A. 13 + J. R17.

A much needed upgrade.

WP_20220227_22_01_20_Pro.jpg

WP_20220227_22_02_57_Pro.jpg

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On 2/20/2022 at 10:42 PM, Peckris 2 said:

From davidrj's collection. As you can understand I'm well pleased with this!

Chris, isn't this a F174 ?

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