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Coin aquisition of the week.......

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Who’s Reen?

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23 hours ago, JLS said:

Fair enough. I guess my point is that both modern mint commemorative offerings and struck-for collectors 18th century tokens lack any of the constraints which apply to regular coinage, and we might appreciate the former less than they deserve due to a lack of perspective...things made of metal last a long time. I'm sure the commemorative coin mania will be temporary, but IMO it certainly will provide an interesting field for numismatists of the far future. Just look at all the specious Brexit themed 50 pences (of very dubious aesthetic value) being produced for one thing...

I could be entirely mistaken, but the small number of struck-for collectors 18th century tokens are not readily distinguishable from the vast mintage of tokens for small change. I see the modern RM issues for collectors as similar to the Franklin issues except that they are nominally legal tender, i.e. destined to become a drag on the secondary market.

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15 hours ago, Peckris 2 said:

I could be entirely mistaken, but the small number of struck-for collectors 18th century tokens are not readily distinguishable from the vast mintage of tokens for small change. I see the modern RM issues for collectors as similar to the Franklin issues except that they are nominally legal tender, i.e. destined to become a drag on the secondary market.

There are definitely whole series of 18th century "tokens" which are really just medals sold as tokens, and never saw circulation; e.g. almost all of the Spence pieces, and many of the issues of Kempson, Skidmore and Denton. 

The contrast with the modern RM issues is really that the mintage of the collectors 18th century tokens were generally pretty small (at most a few thousand, typically only a few hundred or even less), whereas the RM produces millions of commemorative coins every year. 

My prediction would be that things like the Queen Anne £5, with mintage ~12,000 will retain value, whereas anything with mintage above 100,000 or so just won't have enough collector demand to be worth much in the long run (Kew Gardens included, except perhaps really choice mint pieces !). You see a similar effect in the US commemorative series (admittedly of rather better artistic quality), where the Old Spanish Trail piece of 1935 with a mintage ~10,000 is worth a lot of money, and the Booker T. Washington pieces with mintages of 1,000,000 + have little value except in choice mint state; and that's with a much larger collecting population. 

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I have not posted on here for a while but have a few additions:

Sixpence:

1723-sixpence.jpg

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Plus one more Sixpence for the hell of it:

1824-sixpence.jpg

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A Halfcrown, I am really struggling to get this to look lighter through the slab:

1844-hc.jpg

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1 hour ago, Nonmortuus said:

I have not posted on here for a while but have a few additions:

Sixpence:

1723-sixpence.jpg

I love the die clash of "SS" behind George's head. Can you see the whole reverse design ghosted if you rotate the coin through the light ? There's obviously something going on near the X of REX too. 

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Pretty much where you can see a die clash on the picture is where its visible on the coin in hand.

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Some really nice additions! I particularly like the die clash on the George I shilling, and the Young Head halfcrown. 

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4 hours ago, Nonmortuus said:

A Halfcrown, I am really struggling to get this to look lighter through the slab:

1844-hc.thumb.jpg.7eb238bf5abca61c64761487a14d12f9.jpg

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17 minutes ago, Peckris 2 said:

1844-hc.thumb.jpg.7eb238bf5abca61c64761487a14d12f9.jpg

That's great thank! What do you use to do it?

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Very nice with a well struck reverse. Many of the first type Victorian  half crowns are weakly struck on the reverse especially the harp and the surrounding leaves in the wreaths.

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On 5/7/2020 at 10:25 PM, Nonmortuus said:

That's great thank! What do you use to do it?

I simply opened it in Apple's very basic Preview program, then adjusted the highlight/midtones sliders in Levels to brighten and lighten it. Took me less than a minute!

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If you are on Windows, Photoscape, which is free to download, will do the same as well as making cropping, resizing and many other minor edits very easy.

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No pics yet, but a rather scarce issued quid from a wee Scottish bank that barely scraped into the 20th century under it's shingle.

An' now I hae me sights set on some cunyie.

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Is it the Linen Bank?

 

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Linen stuck around until 1970 - have lots of them as I like the blue colours of the notes.  Nah, much scarcer an' older.

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Picked up a decent example of the 1854HP with V over inverted A in VICTORIA. Don't think many of these have been found, just wish it had been an 1860 Penny with same error!

Don't collect HP's so it will be sold when I get round to it, if anyone is interested please PM me before it goes into auction.

 

1854HP V over inverted A.jpg

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My latest acquisition a 1926 florin graded PCGS MS 64. I'm not sure it's MS 64 perhaps a bit lower but the price was okay. As discussed recently in another thread these .500 KG V  coins are hard to get in the higher grades.

Clipboard 1.jpg

img119.jpg

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1 hour ago, ozjohn said:

My latest acquisition a 1926 florin graded PCGS MS 64. I'm not sure it's MS 64 perhaps a bit lower but the price was okay. As discussed recently in another thread these .500 KG V  coins are hard to get in the higher grades.

Clipboard 1.jpg

I think this may be a case of "market grading" in the sense that the obverse is a bit weaker than the ascribed grade, and the reverse is a bit better. It's very attractive with all the lustre in the devices, well done. 

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