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Coin aquisition of the week.......

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I am always glad for those that like coins, but just can't say this is one for me. The RM is going absolutely hog wild with all of their releases, and even if limited mintage, I somewhat have the feeling that these will be bundled up eventually as some sort of "Early 21st Century Royal Mint Type Material", and then sold by weight or some similar method...perhaps much as the US Mint issues of $5 gold commems have gone. 

So I do hope each and every love the designs, but don't think they are much of an investment. That having been said, I dutifully collect the Britannia silvers each year up to the 5 oz size. Smart? Nope, not at all....

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3 hours ago, VickySilver said:

I am always glad for those that like coins, but just can't say this is one for me. The RM is going absolutely hog wild with all of their releases, and even if limited mintage, I somewhat have the feeling that these will be bundled up eventually as some sort of "Early 21st Century Royal Mint Type Material", and then sold by weight or some similar method...perhaps much as the US Mint issues of $5 gold commems have gone. 

So I do hope each and every love the designs, but don't think they are much of an investment. That having been said, I dutifully collect the Britannia silvers each year up to the 5 oz size. Smart? Nope, not at all....

I believe there is some sort of 50p celebration going on, I certainly won’t be buying into it all, this was my first only because I liked the design, i’ve Already sent back the piedfort Hawking and 4 silver proof Queens beast Yales, terrible quality

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1919 Florin another coin that I had put in a draw and mislaid. It is slabbed   CGS 75. Well struck high grade examples of these coins are difficult to find as the strike quality is terrible in a lot of cases. This one's not too bad with the King's ear well struck on the obverse but the reverse upper shield is correspondingly weak with ghosting clearly visible.

Clipboard.jpg

Edited by ozjohn
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A farthing.

Certainly could to be G over something, though metal cud is another possibility. If it is G over another letter then I would be the likely candidate.

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35 minutes ago, Michael-Roo said:

 

A farthing.

Certainly could to be G over something, though metal cud is another possibility. If it is G over another letter then I would be the likely candidate.

Pardon my ignorance, but I see this word sometimes on US sites- what is a 'cud' ?

I suspect it's just a die break fill, but i could be miles off..

Is there a simple British equivalent word?

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2 minutes ago, blakeyboy said:

Pardon my ignorance, but I see this word sometimes on US sites- what is a 'cud' ?

I suspect it's just a die break fill, but i could be miles off..

Is there a simple British equivalent word?

The portion of food that a ruminant returns from the first stomach to the mouth to chew a second time.

The second line description is better numismatically, piece of metal/foreign object attaching itself to the die or planchet causing a raised error/feature (cud) on the finished coin

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36 minutes ago, Chingford said:

The portion of food that a ruminant returns from the first stomach to the mouth to chew a second time.

The second line description is better numismatically, piece of metal/foreign object attaching itself to the die or planchet causing a raised error/feature (cud) on the finished coin

 

Indeed.

Here's a 1674 farthing of mine which has cuds to spare.

1674-obverse-cuds.jpg

1674-reverse-cuds.jpg

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55 minutes ago, Coin#addict said:

Sorry guys, it's a half penny 😳😳😳

 

A farthing.

Here's a 1773 half penny. In absence of a given diameter the easiest way to tell them apart is to compare Britannia.

285.jpg

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Correct Michael. Forgive my ignorance. I,m new to collecting copper coins and it looked bigger than a farthing to me, hence I thought it was a half penny. It weighs about 5 grams.  But still my nicest coin 👍

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3 hours ago, Chingford said:

The portion of food that a ruminant returns from the first stomach to the mouth to chew a second time.

The second line description is better numismatically, piece of metal/foreign object attaching itself to the die or planchet causing a raised error/feature (cud) on the finished coin

Well, the first one is very familiar to me - my workshop is in an old cowshed, on a farm still fattening steers.....

 

The second  one, as used in coins, I couldn't find...Oxford, Cambridge, Macmillan, not even Merriam Webster 

or Funk and Wagnell...where is it from?  Why 'cud'??  It seems to be an Americanism primarily.....

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Hi colleagues

CUD in my vernacular stands for Coin Under Done and its actually a raised irregular feature on the coin. Its caused by a loss of surface metal from the dies so its in relief (raised) on the coin and incuse on the dies. So not as described above! Not of a piece of foreign material adhering to the die in that case it would be incuse on the coin i.e. below the regular surface. Hope this helps

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happened a lot with the re-strike india series(and most re strikes in general i imaging), one way to identify if a proof is a re-strike and which mint was responsible for it is to look at the quality of the die used. When polishing you can get the surfaces mirror like but pits still remain(fields)

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Its not often that i get impressed by something modern, but this is one of those rare times

Dragon Joined.jpg

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10 minutes ago, azda said:

Its not often that i get impressed by something modern, but this is one of those rare times

Dragon Joined.jpg

Indeed. An exquisite, intricate design. 

As you suggest, very unusually high quality in these dumbed down times. 

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The level of detail that has gone into everything is really impressive, only just noticed this map on the underside of the box lid after showing the boss the coin

Screenshot 2019-04-19 at 09.59.41.png

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My new five shillings  Bank Token.

Nice getting two coins for the price of one.

George III bank token.JPG

George III bank token rev.JPG

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You can really see quite a bit of the original coin, any idea what it was ?

 

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3 minutes ago, Sleepy said:

You can really see quite a bit of the original coin, any idea what it was ?

 

They were re-struck from Spanish - American 8-Reales.

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 Half Crown Edward VI

Lovely clear legends. The King and horse not so good. 

But what a cracking hammered coin to hold in your hand.

Edward VI half crown.JPG

Edward VI half crown rev.JPG

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4 hours ago, Gaz T said:

My new five shillings  Bank Token.

Nice getting two coins for the price of one.

George III bank token.JPG

George III bank token rev.JPG

Help appreciated with possible i.d of the underlying mint mark, i believe its possibly under the A in ENGLAND.

large 1.JPG

large 2.JPG

large 3.JPG

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