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Coin aquisition of the week.......

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is it me or does the one in the date look a little bit phallic? :)

Nice example!

Edited by Unwilling Numismatist
I have 5 thumbs on each hand.

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This arrived today. I originally thought it was 1737/5 from the sellers pictures. But now I have looked at it it isn't a 5 . I think it is a 3 the curve part which isn't present on the 3 because it's broken would be there if it was normal. What do you think ?

 

 

1737over3-horz.jpg

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1737-vert.jpg

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That segment in front of the 7 looks more like part of a 6 to me, and fits well with my 1736 - detail herewith:

(Apologies for the slightly blurry image - taken before I got the hang of my new camera!)

1736 HD 1 detail.JPG

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I have a few odd Maundy coins but on Friday night a seller was selling several sets without boxes.

I tried to snipe the 1st set but lost out....decisions!!!! so I whacked in bids early for about 5 sets and ended up with 3.

1901,05,08.

Total £250 delivered.They will be honored in my new Maunday tray in one of my cabinets....stuff the boxes. I am now quenched of this series.The 1d in the 1905 was not up to Peter standards but hey it can be sorted.

 

PS maybe a more recent set to add

 

Edited by Peter

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saw a 2018 set sell the other day for £550 :ph34r:

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4 hours ago, rpeddie said:

saw a 2018 set sell the other day for £550 :ph34r:

For some ludicrous and unknown reason, sets of the current year go for insane prices, only to drop like a stone when the next set is issued. Twas ever thus with Maundy.

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An 1846 Marrian & Gausby ONE CENTUM pattern in white metal with a few marks but much rarer than the copper pieces and acceptable. 

Somewhat inexplicably, this was only included by Peck in his 2nd edition as a footnote reference where it was stated that an original boxed set of 1, 2, 5 & 10 cents had been discovered also containing a 1 Centum piece in white metal (P G Smith collection). As in Peck's note, the die axis is inverted, suggesting an original strike. 

N.B. REFERENCE ERROR

Freeman notes on p.188 (2nd ed.) that these are in antimony (approx. 90% lead and 10% tin). Firstly, antimony being an element in its own right renders this statement invalid. There is nothing to suggest that antimony was used for this or any of Moore's Victorian patterns, as chemical analysis has shown an alloy of lead and tin in varying ratios. Tin is obviously one metal of choice for making medals, and by extension freely available for coins . The 90% lead to 10% tin quoted by Freeman is also wrong. 

A comparison of my M&G 2 cents which is struck in copper, vital statistics 29.35mm diameter, 2.2mm thick at the rim, weight 11.29g and this One Centum, vital statistics 27.9mm diameter, 2.8mm thick at the rim and weight 10.77g, shows that the density of the latter is therefore approximately 18% less than the copper coin. This is suggestive of a high tin content as opposed to lead. Maybe the element ratio was transposed when the book was written, as this would give an excellent fit for the statistics measured. 

The equivalent value of One Centum is uncertain. It appears on some Godless florin pattern reverses alongside 100 milles from which one might conclude that it was 1/10th of a pound. However, in the case of the Marrian & Gausby issue you find values of 1, 2, 5 & 10 cents, which surely must refer to a cent being 1/100th of a pound, and therefore the 10 cents piece and the 1 centum duplicate the value for 1/10th of a pound. Montagu (1885) mentions the 1 centum, but doesn't speculate on its equivalent value, whilst Peck (1964) speculates that it probably represented a decimal shilling of 50 cents, where a pound improbably equalled 1000 cents made up of 20 centums. In the absence of any adopted denomination, none of these arguments can be said to be right, though clearly the RM should be the most likely option with one centum equalling 100 milles, or 10 cents, or one tenth of a pound. Take your pick.

c2127 1846 M&G One Centum.jpg

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I was pleased to find this lurking in a job lot picked up at market over the weekend. The whole lot cost me £20 and there was at least that in scrap silver in there, so this one owes me nothing and is a reasonable upgrade:

 

1870 HD 7+G 1 Red.JPG

1870 HD 7+G 2 Red.JPG

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@PaddyI'd be well chuffed with that for the best part of 15 quid, so I guess you did pretty well there! :)

 

Edited by Unwilling Numismatist
#beerfingers
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Another Sixpence added to the collection. Although nicely toned and it does look better in hand than my pictures show. It was sold to me as GEF which I think is a little ambitious on the grade. Your opinions on this, please.  It also came with a ticket from Spinks so is there any way I can trace the provenance of the coin, please.

1902 Victoria Sixpence Rev 400.jpg1902 Victoria Sixpence Obv 400.jpg1902 Victoria Sixpence Spinks Ticket.jpg

Edited by UPINSMOKE

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Certainly EF, though I'm a bit worried by those parallel abrasions on the obverse, which may be the (temporary) result of wiping with a cloth, or having been cleaned once.

A Spink ticket is worth having, but I'm not sure you'd want or need to go further back than that on a 1902 sixpence! 

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KCWYn9P.jpg

got these 4 for a £2 quid. the 1861 is Obverse 5

 

 

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could you let me know who our expert is on Charles i shillings tower ...the first two portraits with the ruff?

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could you help me with this 

s-l1600 (1) (300x284).jpg

s-l1600 (2) (300x283).jpg

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is this from the welsh mint ?

CM180614-194556003 (269x300).jpg

CM180614-194534002 (271x300).jpg

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Try Tom Goodheart (Richard - if he is still a member), or Rob

@TomGoodheart

Edited by Paulus

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21 hours ago, scott said:

KCWYn9P.jpg

got these 4 for a £2 quid. the 1861 is Obverse 5

 

 

 

Yey! Scott's back!

Hello mate, good to see you on here again. The forum hasn't been the same without you. ;)

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1 hour ago, Paulus said:

Try Tom Goodheart (Richard - if he is still a member), or Rob

@TomGoodheart

Thanks I search for him 

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1 hour ago, Michael-Roo said:

 

Yey! Scott's back!

Hello mate, good to see you on here again. The forum hasn't been the same without you. ;)

Ditto from me :) 

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3 hours ago, DrLarry said:

is this from the welsh mint ?

CM180614-194556003 (269x300).jpg

CM180614-194534002 (271x300).jpg

Struck at the Tower Mint from Welsh silver, hence the plume above shield.

The coins struck at Aberystwyth were those of Charles I bearing the book initial mark. In the case of the shillings there is a plume before the bust, but even the small coins feature the Welsh plume. There are several types of 'Aberystwyth' bust which mirror those seen at Tower.

04737 - Copy.jpg

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1 hour ago, Peckris said:

Ditto from me :) 

I did wonder where Scott had gone to. Same applies to Azda too. Not seen him around for ages.

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10 minutes ago, Rob said:

Struck at the Tower Mint from Welsh silver, hence the plume above shield.

The coins struck at Aberystwyth were those of Charles I bearing the book initial mark. In the case of the shillings there is a plume before the bust, but even the small coins feature the Welsh plume. There are several types of 'Aberystwyth' bust which mirror those seen at Tower.

04737 - Copy.jpg

ok thanks , I tried to understand the paper in the BNJ 1977 but obvious I did not read it too well 

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