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Coin aquisition of the week.......

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Thank you! I stretched my usual budget for it.

But somehow my photography skills seem to bring every hairline to life...

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Would you guys kindly give me an opinion on grade on this Gothic Florin

Cheers

Jamie

1874gothicgvf125.jpg

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GVF as there is still some lustre hidden under the lettering and on reverse, wear to the devices and possibly a bit of field polish, esp. on the obverse.

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1 hour ago, VickySilver said:

GVF as there is still some lustre hidden under the lettering and on reverse, wear to the devices and possibly a bit of field polish, esp. on the obverse.

Thanks VS, that's what Colin Cooke graded at (GVF or Better)..  Aye I was surprised at the remaining lustre in hand to be honest, nice example for my budget..  Very happy indeed 

Cheers

Jamie

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I am starting to collect Half Crowns. This is my second purchase, I would welcome some comments on grade and pointers on what to look for in future purchase.

Unknown.jpeg

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GEF?

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I'd agree, nice revers that is of Unc . quality, the obv/ with just a bit of rub at high points (bagging marks possibly).

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Thanks for the comments guys. it was sold as virtually BU but always wary of overgrading and would always err on the side of caution.

The detail in hand looks good to me other than the faces of the lions which are better in the top half of the shield with the ones in the bottom quarter not as sharp.

The toning has not really come out in the photo, but its just starting to develop a lovely light yellow around the edge.

Overall I am happy with it and looking forward to getting some more.

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Beautiful HC Ian. IMO as struck. You won't need to upgrade a specimen like that.

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5 hours ago, IanB said:

Thanks for the comments guys. it was sold as virtually BU but always wary of overgrading and would always err on the side of caution.

The detail in hand looks good to me other than the faces of the lions which are better in the top half of the shield with the ones in the bottom quarter not as sharp.

The toning has not really come out in the photo, but its just starting to develop a lovely light yellow around the edge.

Overall I am happy with it and looking forward to getting some more.

Nice buy Ian. I am also into halfcrowns at the moment  and really like this series. 

On the topic of grading, I think it is rather unhelpful that some dealers use such a wide range of terms for the top condition coins

As struck 

Mint state

Practically as struck

Virtually as struck

choice BU

BU

Virtually BU

Almost BU 

Choice virtually BU

etc etc.

Are the following translations reasonably accurate?  "As struck" and "Mint State" mean UNC without too many bag marks and (in theory) has full lustre. choice BU means the same but with some lustre. PAS = UNC with a few more marks (and occasionally even a trace of rub = AU). Virtually as struck or virtually BU = cabinet friction i.e. AU or more likely GEF, Almost BU = GEF (or AU if you are lucky)

Choice means not so many bag marks

Top grade = complete lie. If it's really UNC, sellers will be shouting that.

High Grade = anything but. VF to NEF (if lucky). Very high grade = NEF

Nice Grade = F - F+ and avoid like the plague

Collectable grade = rubbish generally

doesn't detract =  generally sticks out like a sore thumb 

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1 hour ago, Sword said:

Nice buy Ian. I am also into halfcrowns at the moment  and really like this series. 

On the topic of grading, I think it is rather unhelpful that some dealers use such a wide range of terms for the top condition coins

As struck 

Mint state

Practically as struck

Virtually as struck

choice BU

BU

Virtually BU

Almost BU 

Choice virtually BU

etc etc.

Are the following translations reasonably accurate?  "As struck" and "Mint State" mean UNC without too many bag marks and (in theory) has full lustre. choice BU means the same but with some lustre. PAS = UNC with a few more marks (and occasionally even a trace of rub = AU). Virtually as struck or virtually BU = cabinet friction i.e. AU or more likely GEF, Almost BU = GEF (or AU if you are lucky)

Choice means not so many bag marks

Top grade = complete lie. If it's really UNC, sellers will be shouting that.

High Grade = anything but. VF to NEF (if lucky). Very high grade = NEF

Nice Grade = F - F+ and avoid like the plague

Collectable grade = rubbish generally

doesn't detract =  generally sticks out like a sore thumb 

 

Sword, you are soooo right with you insight in grading terms, I love it! :D

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Dealer invented grades, take a higher grade (better return) then tell you it isn't by adding Almost/Practically/Near

 

 

 

 

 

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That's a really useful list of grades Sword. I think I might print it out and stick it next to my screen so that I can decipher their code.

 

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It does have some tiny marks and a few knocks in the rim. If those lions are the result of clogged die or weak strike, the Americans would call it MS60 or even higher, wouldn't they?

Excellent purchase anyway, Ian

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The lions are not completely struck up at the lower right, particularly the head and forequarters of the middle. Not wear. The obverse edge contact is not generally thought serious as it does not deflect the inner aspect of the rim, nor is there raised metal of note. I would likely use the obverse as the major grade determiner of the coin as a whole and probably put it at the AU55-58 level because of what appears slightly more than just bag marking and depending on seeing it in hand, but if grading solely from the reverse probably go 62.

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Oh my giddy head, that Sheldon scale is a thing to try and get my brain around. I am just getting it to work on F, VF & EF. :blink:

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My Spink win today. George 1, 1726 sixpence.

Photo is from Spink.

PxU96W.jpg

Edited by jaggy
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1 hour ago, jaggy said:

My Spink win today. George 1, 1726 sixpence.

Photo is from Spink.

PxU96W.jpg

That's REALLY nice Jaggy! :)

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3 hours ago, jaggy said:

My Spink win today. George 1, 1726 sixpence.

Photo is from Spink.

PxU96W.jpg

Ooooosh! Gorgeous, Jags!

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Opinions are sought. 4 months late but never mind.

I bought this in Stewartby part 4 in November (lot 1450). I catalogued it as cross in circle, but looking at it from different angles I think it could possibly be annulet over lis. The coin is definintely Durham under Bp. L Booth as the mint signature is DER AM and there is a D in the centre of the reverse. B by the neck confirms this as Booth's coinage. The question therefore arises as to whether the mintmark annulet over lis as I think it could be or as recorded by Stewartby as a cross in circle and so whether this is originally a York obverse die that was transferred to Durham. Chronologically Lis was a mark at York during Henry VI restored and continued into Edward IV's second reign to be superseded by short cross fitchee (also known over lis), followed by annulet and cross in circle. Short cross fitchee is rare and presumably very short lived, with the implication that annulet soon followed lis.

Historically, Archbishop Neville's temporalities were suspended at York in 1472 meaning he would not be permitted to strike coins. His dies would therefore be available for recycling (which appears to have been the norm) and could easily be passed to Bp. Booth at Durham who was not implicated in the double crossing of Edward by the Neville family who changed sides prior to Henry VI's restoration. The B and trefoil could easily have been added later.

Therefore, does anybody have an Edward VI 2nd reign York penny with a lis, annulet or cross in circle mark to enable a die comparison? I've never seen one before and so have no reference point. Although there are certain similarities with the plain cross initial mark seen on the heavy coinage dies, the mark on this coin is at the edge of the coin and difficult to establish whether it has been cut off to give the appearance of a lis.

I appreciate that a lot of you will be overcome with indifference, but console yourselves with the fact that at least it is a penny. Any input would be gratefully received.

 

c2074 Ed.IV 2nd coinage 1d Durham under Bp Booth mm.cross or lis over annulet.jpg

cross in circle mintmark.jpg

B left of neck.jpg

trefoil right of neck.jpg

Edited by Rob
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On 28/03/2017 at 9:51 AM, IanB said:

I am starting to collect Half Crowns. This is my second purchase, I would welcome some comments on grade and pointers on what to look for in future purchase.

Unknown.jpeg

Really nice Ian, one of the best pieces of advice I can give is to view pics of your coin or prospective purchases alongside others of a similar/better grade. 'benchmark' coins if you like. Which coins you choose to benchmark against is of course crucial, and if they are toned when yours are not it can make comparison harder.

This is (currently) my best veiled head HC, CGS 78 (UNC), hope it helps :)

1893_hc_02_cgs_78_uin_30548_1300.png

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Edward IV 1st reign Heavy Coinage penny of Durham, struck under Bp. Laurence Booth using local dies. Also ex Stewartby, lot 1360c and Lockett 1600.

 

c2075 Ed.IV heavy coinage 1d Durham under Bp L Booth Local Dies.jpg

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That is excellent advice Paulus. Benchmarking is a great way of knowing what to aim for even with the differences between toned and untoned the comparison between the detail is obvious such as the lion's faces and the strings on the harp.

Yours is a stunning coin the toning gives it a depth and contrast between each element and certainly makes Victoria look more alive.

 

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A dog of a coin, but excessively rare. Edward IV halfpenny of Canterbury struck under Archbishop Bourchier with trefoils by the neck.

When this coin was illustrated in the BNJ vol. XLI, it was noted there was one other known in the RCB collection, but that without the trefoils. Apart from the other coin in lot 1438 which was a 1998 find and without trefoils, are there any more? ex Delme-Radcliffe 288 and Stewartby 1438a.

 

c2078 Henry VII Canterbury halfpenny mm. Pall.jpg

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