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Coin aquisition of the week.......

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Cool...Thanks.

Bob C.

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Any one know anything about this coin? I cannnot find it listed anywhere.......my best guess is a half sovereign

2003382939065853281_rs.jpg

Obverse legend; VICTORIA QUEEN OF GREAT BRITAIN 1851

Reverse legend; THE PRINCE OF WALES MODEL HALF SOV RN

Although it has not been cleaned I am sure its gold!

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I'm 100% sure it's brass!

Those are quite common, the Prince of Wales model half sovs. To me they fall into the same catagory as the model pennies, half pennies, Cumberland Jacks, gaming guineas and other novelty counters/trial/toy coins that were being produced at that time.

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Chris thanks!

I had just found this info about the coin;

"A related counter was the 'Prince of Wales model sovereign' and half sovereign, issued from 1842 until the 1870s. The obverse showed the queen's head, but the reverse showed the emblems of the prince of wales and the legend 'The Prince of Wales Model Sovrn' or 'Half Sovrn'. The halves were particularly common and were often partnered with the 'To Hanover' sovereign. Other gaming counters were much less closely based on coin types, for example the 'Keep Your Temper' pieces, which usually depicted a card-player on front."

I will get rich one day.................soon!

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Picked up a few half crowns at a local coin club meeting here in Indiana this week. Here is one of them, an uncirculated 1887.

Once a year they club has a 'dealer" night, in addition to the monthly coin auction. On this night members get a chance to display a bourse table and sell duplicates to other members. It a fun night local for collectors.

Bob C.

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post-509-1195581016_thumb.jpg

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Picked up a few half crowns at a local coin club meeting here in Indiana this week. Here is one of them, an uncirculated 1887.

Once a year they club has a 'dealer" night, in addition to the monthly coin auction. On this night members get a chance to display a bourse table and sell duplicates to other members. It a fun night local for collectors.

Bob C.

I tried to correct my last sentence, and failed...sorry.

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Nice coin Bob.

I wish I had a local coin club. There was the Edinburgh Numismatic Society but after finding their details on line and after contacting their then president Nicholas Holmes (Curator of Numismatics, Royal Museum of Scotland). I found out its no longer active. It finished a couple of years back due to no one new joining and old members dying. The next closes one is in Glasgow but that's about 80 miles away, which realistically is to far for me to travel.

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I wish I had a local coin club. There was the Edinburgh Numismatic Society but after finding their details on line and after contacting their then president Nicholas Holmes (Curator of Numismatics, Royal Museum of Scotland). I found out its no longer active. It finished a couple of years back due to no one new joining and old members dying. The next closes one is in Glasgow but that's about 80 miles away, which realistically is to far for me to travel.

I also wish I had a local coin club, does anyone of of any in the Leicestershire area. The only places I purchase coins from is the internet.

I picked up this half crown recently on ebay.

post-4030-1195593060_thumb.jpg

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post-4030-1195593696_thumb.jpg

I wish I had a local coin club. There was the Edinburgh Numismatic Society but after finding their details on line and after contacting their then president Nicholas Holmes (Curator of Numismatics, Royal Museum of Scotland). I found out its no longer active. It finished a couple of years back due to no one new joining and old members dying. The next closes one is in Glasgow but that's about 80 miles away, which realistically is to far for me to travel.

I also wish I had a local coin club, does anyone of of any in the Leicestershire area. The only places I purchase coins from is the internet.

I picked up this half crown recently on ebay.

Sorry missed the reverse

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post-4030-1195593696_thumb.jpg
I wish I had a local coin club. There was the Edinburgh Numismatic Society but after finding their details on line and after contacting their then president Nicholas Holmes (Curator of Numismatics, Royal Museum of Scotland). I found out its no longer active. It finished a couple of years back due to no one new joining and old members dying. The next closes one is in Glasgow but that's about 80 miles away, which realistically is to far for me to travel.

I also wish I had a local coin club, does anyone of of any in the Leicestershire area. The only places I purchase coins from is the internet.

I picked up this half crown recently on ebay.

Sorry missed the reverse

Does anyone know the best way to remove the black spots on the obverse, or is it best to leave them alone

Mark

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I went to Bamberg in Bavaria over the weekend. I know of a shop there where I'd picked up a £5 coin for less than £5, so I like to visit there when I can! I can buy £5 coins for EUR5 all day long.

This time I asked if he had anything British. 'No' was the instant answer, so I reminded him that I'd bought a couple of British things in the past including a WWI medal named to an officer. He rooted around some bags and found 3 medals. Two of them were horrible 60s things that looked cheap and nasty and the other was a beautiful large Wyon busted 1879 Victorian medal with a wonderful Gothic like reverse.

(for search engines) The obverse reads HER MAJESTY QUEEN VICTORIA / PATRONESS. The large bust is signed W.WYON.R.A

The reverse reads: ROYAL AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY OF ENGLAND (which a quick google search reveals are still going strong) / MANSION HOUSE COMMITTEE 1879. And the Latin on the coat of arms: DOMINE DIRIGE NOS.

Weight: 90 grammes.

Diameter: 54.92mm

On the rim at the botton is the inscription: MESSRS JOHN BARTH & SON.

The name is interesting because BARTH is a very German name (pronounced Bart) so I wonder if that connection is something to do with how it found its way to Bamberg!

I paid EUR30 for it (about £22) and I was more than pleased to do so. Does anyone have any info on this medal at all? I could find no record of it searching the net. I wonder how many were produced.

post-1-1197481205_thumb.jpg

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(for search engines) The obverse reads HER MAJESTY QUEEN VICTORIA / PATRONESS. The large bust is signed W.WYON.R.A

The reverse reads: ROYAL AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY OF ENGLAND (which a quick google search reveals are still going strong) / MANSION HOUSE COMMITTEE 1879. And the Latin on the coat of arms: DOMINE DIRIGE NOS.

Weight: 90 grammes.

Diameter: 54.92mm

On the rim at the botton is the inscription: MESSRS JOHN BARTH & SON.

The name is interesting because BARTH is a very German name (pronounced Bart) so I wonder if that connection is something to do with how it found its way to Bamberg!

I paid EUR30 for it (about £22) and I was more than pleased to do so. Does anyone have any info on this medal at all? I could find no record of it searching the net. I wonder how many were produced.

Not sure on the medal and knowing more about it than this, it is a very nicely executed William Wyon work, with nice high relief and a nice bust of the Queen.

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italia50lire1911.jpg

I have wanted one of the 10 Centesimi in BU, but so far cannot find so I settled for this in the meanwhile. There were 20K produced in 1911, which was a high number, but many were melted beginning in the 1920's when the Lire started its' downward spiral. It is a classic design and celebrates the 50th anniversary of the Kingdom of Italy.

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post-226-1197492503_thumb.jpgpost-226-1197492520_thumb.jpg

Just a filler! Edward III Pre-treaty Bishop Hatfield Durham (pity about the obverse!)

Edited by Geordie582

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Nice medal Chris. I had a look on:

http://medals4trade.com/collections/thumbn...=556&page=1

to see if it was there but unfortunately I can't see it. I'll PM the owner of the website Dan to see if he knows anymore about it. He is quite knowledgeable when it comes to Victorian medals and has a lot of reference books on the subject.

Dave thats a cracking coin, I have a weakness for gold and the design is superb.

Nice hammered Geordie.

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Thanks Hus.

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The latest additions, one I thought it would take a lot longer to find, a very tough year especially in this grade :D

1873.jpg

1873b.jpg

The lustre is 99% full, the image does not do it justice!!

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Next from an auction house that had failed to spot the 1844 N/E in REGINA half farthing in this batch of 5, which all had really good lustre (a couple are full lustre). There is some slight wear to the hair, evidence of a clashed die on the reverse and the coin appears to have slipped slightly in the collar. The photos do not really do the coin justice, it has radiant lustre which is a little patchy around the edges, but will nicely replace the one I bought from Rob earlier this year.

I thought others would pick up on it, but they didn't and I got it for a bargain!!

EN.jpg

ENB.jpg

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Lovely farthing and fractionals CG, I am always amazed at the detail in the rose and thistle on the fractional farthings. I have a BU example of one from the 1840's, not sure of the date anymore, but I love the excellent engraving on the piece.

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The latest additions, one I thought it would take a lot longer to find, a very tough year especially in this grade :D

1873.jpg

1873b.jpg

The lustre is 99% full, the image does not do it justice!!

Colin,

Beautiful 1872 Farthing! Thanks for sharing.

Bob C.

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Dave thats a cracking coin, I have a weakness for gold and the design is superb.

You're right Huss, excellent reverse. In the early years of the last century, our coinage stagnated. We dabbled with the beautiful 1902-10 florins but then reverted to type with one re-hashed design after another and never produced anything of this quality. I love it.

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Colin

A Kelly Brook of a farthing (1872) :P

My 1717 received on Friday has had me in a whirlwind this weekend :rolleyes:

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s5487.jpg

An example of an extremely rare coin, which was minted from 1582-1586 with the then having attained majority portrait of James VI. The legend IACOBUS 6 DEI GRATIA REX SCOTORUM translates as James 6 by the grace of God, King of Scots. The young king holds a sword, a symbol of his authority. The reverse of the coin has the Scottish arms, I R and XXX S for Thirty Shillings, the denomination of the coin. The legend around the reverse is HONOR REGIS IUDICUM DILIGIT 1586, which translates to "The Kings power loveth judgement", unfortunately his son, Charles I would face that judgement in 1649. This coin is S-5487 in Seaby, and SJ630-025 in Coincraft. Curiously this denomination would not be issued again until after James VI accessed the English throne in 1603, and portrays the king on horseback.

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