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Ebay's Worst Offerings

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Someone got it for £205 - bit of a bargain there, I'd say.

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11 minutes ago, Peckris 2 said:

It's a twopence, quite possibly genuine?

I concur. I can't see anything wrong.

Quick checks are  4 berries - is a twopence and on a penny the Trident points to the right of the second N compared to at the N for the 2d, 1/2d & 1/4d, with the last two unlikely to appear on an ebay listing where the vendor doesn't have a clue.

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On 6/21/2020 at 9:26 PM, 1949threepence said:

Once you've seen a lot of genuine pennies, the fake ones hit you in the eye immediately. Even if they're good.

That 1843, despite the artificial wear and knocks, is actually quite poor.    

Probably I'd be unable to recognise fakes of other denominations.

I see that 4 different bidders got caught by that fake 1843, which sold for over £100.

Like you say Mike, 'caveat emptor'. 

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7 minutes ago, alfnail said:

I see that 4 different bidders got caught by that fake 1843, which sold for over £100.

Like you say Mike, 'caveat emptor'. 

As well as the 1853 and 1871. A quick £350 to boost the coffers. Interestingly, the fakes are private listings with bidders' identities hidden, but other auctions are not. 

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apologies to the seller and for wasting your time gents :) does look real

to be fair when comparing against a penny the lettering and design are interestingly very different.

i always thought a reducing machine was used for these, but might be too early for this tech?

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32 minutes ago, rpeddie said:

 

i always thought a reducing machine was used for these, but might be too early for this tech?

As far as I know, yes, no reducing machines anywhere until the 1830s, and none at British mints until the 1850s or 1860s. Definitely not used at Soho in Boulton's day !

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3 hours ago, rpeddie said:

apologies to the seller and for wasting your time gents :) does look real

to be fair when comparing against a penny the lettering and design are interestingly very different.

i always thought a reducing machine was used for these, but might be too early for this tech?

If you're going on pictures alone, and don't have the dimensions, the easiest way is to glance at the portrait. Although the same original design on both denominations, there's more of it on the penny, making the head proportionately smaller. I'll try to find examples to show side by side (twopence first) :

1438735784_17972dobv.jpg.be353d1bec6fa2069db89f384f3ba1ba.jpg  408514939_1797penny(fromeBay).jpg.cc4a03c1ace19e3c08dac734d138ea1b.jpg

 

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I go by the tie ribbon if I'm looking at the obverse.

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7 hours ago, mrbadexample said:

As well as the 1853 and 1871. A quick £350 to boost the coffers. Interestingly, the fakes are private listings with bidders' identities hidden, but other auctions are not. 

Well spotted Jon. 

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3 hours ago, mrbadexample said:

I go by the tie ribbon if I'm looking at the obverse.

The difference in head size is quite dramatic, and you get a feel for it. However, 3 quick ways of spotting it:

1. the point where the chins meet the neck is well over halfway down on the 2d, about halfway on the penny

2. the back of the head is vertically over the back edge of the lower bust on the 2d, but WELL to the right of it on the penny

3. On the 2d, the chin is vertically above the front of the lower bust, on the penny it's the tip of the nose

It does make you wonder why the same bust wasn't used on both denominations.

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18 minutes ago, DaveG38 said:

That's probably because they've identified the likely suckers as being on the other side of the pond. They could really go to town and get them certified as genuine, or maybe even the 'finest known'. :)

 

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41 minutes ago, DaveG38 said:

Shipping to UK is practically selling ice to Eskimos. 

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1 hour ago, Sword said:

Shipping to UK is practically selling ice to Eskimos. 

There's always someone. Never underestimate the capacity of the uninformed to make a bad decision.

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And further down the page an equally enticing embarrassment of riches offered by the same seller.

 

I'm kicking myself for missing the end time on this one: https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/EXTREMELY-RARE-Minting-Error-1-SHILLING-SILVER-COIN-1926-/254606269370?_trksid=p2385738.m4383.l44720.c10&nordt=true&rt=nc&orig_cvip=true

The same seller does though have two other treasures for my consideration, so all is not lost. https://www.ebay.co.uk/sch/daa2323/m.html?item=254606269370&nordt=true&orig_cvip=true&rt=nc&_trksid=p2047675.l2562

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Or something to be found adjacent to a chunk of rotting bark.

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Posted (edited)
1 minute ago, Michael-Roo said:

Or something to be found adjacent to a chunk of rotting bark.

Difficult to say, I'm not very well clued up on my soil toning

Edited by Rob

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17 hours ago, Michael-Roo said:

The same seller does though have two other treasures for my consideration, so all is not lost. https://www.ebay.co.uk/sch/daa2323/m.html?item=254606269370&nordt=true&orig_cvip=true&rt=nc&_trksid=p2047675.l2562

That 1807 is a well known and relatively common contemporary forgery with the casting flaw across the reverse, I think I paid a good £20 for my example...

Curiously the pound coin also appears to be fake !

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You're quite right J, both.

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https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/274326733979

Someone actually thinks a cartwheel penny is a farthing...were the 1790s an age of giants ?!

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