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bob.phillips

maundy 3d vs silver 3d issued for circulation

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Can anyone let me know how to tell the difference between a maundy 3d and a silver 3d issued for normal circulation??

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Coins 728x90

Can anyone let me know how to tell the difference between a maundy 3d and a silver 3d issued for normal circulation??

According to ESC in the note at the bottom of page 184 the ordinary 3d's have a duller surface than the maundy money which is more prooflike with highly polished fields. The latter tone more easily and are often bluish or quite dark. Davies says the same thing.

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It can be quite difficult to tell with coins that have a little wear. Usually Maundy coins are kept pretty nice, so if you have an UNC YH threepence it's probably a maundy.

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Yes, ESC is not quite correct, or at least the perspective is off. Maundy 3d's can vary quite a bit, especially Vickys of the 1840's - 50's and the Edward VII. Both may be either proof-like or satin finish and this with no established reason.

Generally, it is the quality of the strike (especially hair detail about the ear on Vicky or the beard & mustache on Edward VII) and some cases/specimens are clearly Maundy and others are borderline. A good demonstration is to look at the Maundy 4d pieces and to check out how they vary in appearance and strike.

I may be able to answer specific questions as they may come up.

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PS: It is interesting to note the recent increase of 3d's being offered that are rarities in currency, but that are in fact Maundy coins that have been "circulated" or abraded on the surface. Please note that even some Maundy bits have incomplete striking in the hair details...

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Thanks for your inputs. I was rather hoping for a simple answer, but clearly one has to be something of an expert to tell the difference.

It's my first 'question' on the site so far, but as I'm still somewhat of a beginner, I'm sure there will be more. It's a great forum

Thanks again for your inputs.

Bob Phillips

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It is interesting to note the recent increase of 3d's being offered that are rarities in currency, but that are in fact Maundy coins that have been "circulated" or abraded on the surface. Please note that even some Maundy bits have incomplete striking in the hair details...

Yes, there is a lot of that going on, even being sold by coin "experts" claiming that pieces are currency strikes. I recently received such a coin, which was a "rare" currency portrait variety. It was cleaned to look like a currency piece (hairlines were present), but it had the signature prooflike mirror finish still intact. It turns out that the maundy issue of that year used the same portrait, according to Davies. :angry:

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We have possibly belabored the point, but a recent auction by an esteemed US firm offered an encapsulated 1848 3d as currency MS65 and sold as such (for somewhere near to 750 USD) even though it clearly was a Maundy specimen. I would be very suspicious of any well struck 3d pieces in better states of preservation, and especially those of the years 1840 through 1870 as being Maundy.

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I'll confess that i couldn't tell the different between a UNC Circ. and a Maundy.

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