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blakeyboy

I love Venn diagrams!!

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There is no way (Farage, are you listening? :lol:) that Turkey could be considered an EU 'candidate' in the short- or mid-term. Their civil rights record - for one - would preclude them.

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5 hours ago, Peckris 2 said:

There is no way (Farage, are you listening? :lol:) that Turkey could be considered an EU 'candidate' in the short- or mid-term. Their civil rights record - for one - would preclude them.

But according to the diagram above - information sourced by politico from the EU -  Turkey is already an ‘EU candidate’ !  Though I agree they shouldn’t be.

Jerry. 

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27 minutes ago, jelida said:

But according to the diagram above - information sourced by politico from the EU -  Turkey is already an ‘EU candidate’ !  Though I agree they shouldn’t be.

Jerry. 

Only in the sense that they are a long term applicant. But until they become a democracy with acceptable civil rights, they will never be allowed to join (or they'd be members already, long ago).

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Nice place to have a holiday though. Turkish are generally very welcoming, and it has a safer feel than much of the UK. 

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15 hours ago, alfnail said:

Nice place to have a holiday though. Turkish are generally very welcoming, and it has a safer feel than much of the UK. 

Yeah, if you don't fall foul of the authorities, it's a great place - reminds me of Greece in the early 70s, though Turkey doesn't have soldiers with rifles on every corner of its capital.

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30 minutes ago, Peckris 2 said:

Yeah, if you don't fall foul of the authorities, it's a great place - reminds me of Greece in the early 70s, though Turkey doesn't have soldiers with rifles on every corner of its capital.

Difficult not to if you believe in the freedom to believe in or display anything other than the characteristics of Erdogan and his ilk. :(

I suppose you are allowed to be a Kurd as long as you don't profess to want your own homeland. 

Not too keen on his migration towards the religious elements either - religions are divergent in every respect expect for one and that is the unwavering belief that any other religion is profoundly wrong. So many peaceful existences sacrificed on the altar to the great God of Intolerance. :(

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I think Ireland might be a bit upset..... 😬

( Hi guys - I still check in now and then!) 

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I hate the idea that turkey is a full member them and the ruskys are total bedfellows  - just leaders names are not stalin or Mussolini

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3 hours ago, copper123 said:

I hate the idea that turkey is a full member them and the ruskys are total bedfellows  - just leaders names are not stalin or Mussolini

1. Turkey applied for EU membership many years ago and they STILL aren’t. And won't be until their governmental political system is totally reformed, i.e. they've become a democracy.

2. Russia did provide military support to Turkey as part of the fight against ISIS. However, in other matters in Syria they are on opposite sides: Russia supports Assad and opposes the Free Syrian Army, while Turkey is against the former and assists the latter.

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17 hours ago, Debbie said:

I think Ireland might be a bit upset..... 😬

 

About what, exactly?

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Posted (edited)
4 hours ago, blakeyboy said:

About what, exactly?

Oh you never heard the threats from russia against the uk as in nuking it?

Remember Ireland is only a short distance away as well and would also be totally destroyed there again whats another 4 300 000 pointless deaths when you have acheaved your objective

Edited by copper123

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7 hours ago, blakeyboy said:

About what, exactly?

Probably that they aren't in the EU Venn

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On 6/20/2022 at 7:07 AM, alfnail said:

Nice place to have a holiday though. Turkish are generally very welcoming, and it has a safer feel than much of the UK. 

You don't look kurdish then i presume bare in mind they are probably after the hard cash in you wallet and not their micky mouse money

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I definitely don't look Kurdish, more of a Viking, but bald, Yorkshire man.....long live Bairstow! I know many Kurds, and non-Kurds in Turkey, and they seem to live in harmony.....politics and power games are not everyday life for the common folk, who are  just trying to get by helping one another. Turkey actually reminds me a little of the1950's Britain which I grew up in, where front doors were safely left open and people passed the time of day on the street without deliberately looking the other way to avoid contact. In the UK we seem to have lost those common courtisies, and respect for the elders, which the Turkish still hold dear. 

 

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If anybody has visited Istanbul, they'll be aware of the street cats. Thousands of them living independently on the streets and all look in great shape. Nearly all tame and often run up to you meowing for food.

The locals feed the colonies and many of them have erected cat houses for shelter, in their gardens. There are even vending machines for cat food. 

Turkey may have its shortcomings , but I love the fact they take such care of their cats in Istanbul.  

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34 minutes ago, 1949threepence said:

If anybody has visited Istanbul, they'll be aware of the street cats. Thousands of them living independently on the streets and all look in great shape. Nearly all tame and often run up to you meowing for food.

The locals feed the colonies and many of them have erected cat houses for shelter, in their gardens. There are even vending machines for cat food. 

Turkey may have its shortcomings , but I love the fact they take such care of their cats in Istanbul.  

not like the greeks then

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19 minutes ago, copper123 said:

not like the greeks then

Exactly like the Greeks

read and learn

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About Us

Why a Greek Cat Welfare Society?
Greece and the Greek islands are inundated with stray, abandoned and feral cats. The majority of them are born in the spring and survive through the kindness of tourists who feed them.

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At the end of the summer season the tourists leave, and some cats survive through the kindness of local Greeks. However, many die of starvation or fall foul of cat hating people who poison them or worse. Attitudes to animal welfare can be very different in Greece from those in the UK; cats are often viewed as a nuisance and subjected to considerable cruelty, mass poisonings being particularly common before and after the tourist season, to “clean up”. GCWS exists to help reduce this cruelty.

What We Do

Since 1992 we have been promoting the care and welfare of cats in Greece.

 

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Our main strategy is to support neutering of colonies of stray cats to reduce breeding. Trap, neuter and return (TNR) is now recognised to be the only humane, effective method of reducing a stray cat population. Over time TNR will greatly reduce cat numbers, providing it is carried out on an organised basis several times a year.

Our TNR work in an area is carried out in one or both of two ways: By organising volunteer vets and nurses to carry out the neutering in most months of the year; and/or by giving financial and material support to local volunteer groups who organise neutering programmes. We are currently supporting over 30 local groups with grants, equipment, supplies and vets/nurses, in areas including Athens, Crete, Rhodes, Samos, Skyros and Thessaloniki.  (Owing to the workload of managing our support for local groups and the limited number of volunteers available to carry it out, we are not currently taking on new projects.)

Over time, neutering programmes for stray cats steadily reduce the number of stray animals in the area. They also serve as a means to highlight the benefits of neutering, thereby encouraging local pet owners to have their own animals sterilised.

Having been neutered, stray cats are then released back into their locality. Lower numbers mean the cats become healthier through more adequate supplies of food and less fighting, thereby becoming more acceptable to human populations. This in turn encourages people to care for and feed the cats rather than poison them.

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We ensure the cats’ continuing health and welfare by arranging regular feeding and care, including veterinary treatment by local vets when sick or injured. We are in contact with a large number of people all over Greece who daily feed large numbers of stray cats. Any cat neutered will always be fed and monitored by these kind people. However, we only support feeding where a viable neutering programme is in place.  This is because we believe, supported by veterinary advice, that feeding without neutering only increases stray cat populations, working against the objectives of TNR and making the cats’ suffering worse.

As well as neutering, the vets also examine the animals and treat any other complaints. These frequently including fractures, skin wounds, eye problems caused by cat flu, parasites and ear cancer caused by the hot sun, especially in white cats. Occasionally they perform amputations, t

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Unfortunately you will get cat haters and those who regard them as a nuisance, in every country. But generally speaking the public attitude to cats in Greece, is exactly the same as in Turkey. Hence well fed colonies in their towns and cities. 

Probably the main difference between the two countries is down to the fact that in Turkey, cats are more protected by law - link

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11 hours ago, 1949threepence said:

If anybody has visited Istanbul, they'll be aware of the street cats. Thousands of them living independently on the streets and all look in great shape. Nearly all tame and often run up to you meowing for food.

The locals feed the colonies and many of them have erected cat houses for shelter, in their gardens. There are even vending machines for cat food. 

Turkey may have its shortcomings , but I love the fact they take such care of their cats in Istanbul.  

I liked the way cats in Istanbul don't have specific owners. Community cats really, cared for and fed by many. 

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I must admit I ended up de-fleaing and feeding loads of cats everywhere in greece there were so many I would run out of treatment and food after the first couple of days - I found it a thankless task and much as I like greece for itself I wish the cats were not there .....

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