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yaaseen

Advice on splitting proof sets for an album

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So I want to collect a date run of coins in the 1900s, including proofs in a WHSmith album. I have already began to split the proof sets and place them in the album for 1950, 1953 and 1970.

 

My question is that should I be doing this, I read somewhere that proof coins can lose their proof-field once put into an album. I am also worried that in decades to come that these proof coins won't have that lovely shine that they have now. Should I be worried? Or should I just plough ahead?

 

(Of course for most 1927 proofs this does not matter as they have a different design to the circulation coins so they are easily distinguishable - but the same still applies - if I get a 1927 proof set should I split it? Is there damage being done to the coin if I do so?)

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Personally I wouldn't. I had these stored in a 2x2 mylar flip (as delivered from the seller) and now they're considerably impaired. 

1950 proof halfpenny (mylar) (3)s.jpg

1950 proof Scottish shilling (mylar) (3)s.jpg

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1 hour ago, mrbadexample said:

Personally I wouldn't. I had these stored in a 2x2 mylar flip (as delivered from the seller) and now they're considerably impaired. 

1950 proof halfpenny (mylar) (3)s.jpg

1950 proof Scottish shilling (mylar) (3)s.jpg

I agree Jon. Proofs should be treated with the utmost respect. 

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3 minutes ago, 1949threepence said:

I agree Jon. Proofs should be treated with the utmost respect. 

Most people seem to think Mylar's fine but I'd never use it again for anything. Good job these were cheap! :lol:

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12 minutes ago, mrbadexample said:

Most people seem to think Mylar's fine but I'd never use it again for anything. Good job these were cheap! :lol:

If using flips, you need the stiffer PVC FREE type. More subject to cracking, but safer for the coin

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2 minutes ago, Bronze & Copper Collector said:

If using flips, you need the stiffer PVC FREE type. More subject to cracking, but safer for the coin

My preference is nice acid-free 2x2 envelopes. I've never liked flips but that's what they arrived in so I left them. :(

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16 minutes ago, mrbadexample said:

My preference is nice acid-free 2x2 envelopes. I've never liked flips but that's what they arrived in so I left them. :(

That works as well.

It's a matter if personal preference. Some collectors like to view the coin through the flip, others prefer the envelopes with which the argument that it "protects the enclosed coin from light" could be made as well.

So long as there is NO ACID NOR PVC it is better for the coin, ESPECIALLY PROOFS!!

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8 hours ago, yaaseen said:

So I want to collect a date run of coins in the 1900s, including proofs in a WHSmith album. I have already began to split the proof sets and place them in the album for 1950, 1953 and 1970.

My question is that should I be doing this, I read somewhere that proof coins can lose their proof-field once put into an album. I am also worried that in decades to come that these proof coins won't have that lovely shine that they have now. Should I be worried? Or should I just plough ahead?

(Of course for most 1927 proofs this does not matter as they have a different design to the circulation coins so they are easily distinguishable - but the same still applies - if I get a 1927 proof set should I split it? Is there damage being done to the coin if I do so?)

I think it is best to store proofs in an air tight system to maintain lustre. 2x2 self adhesive coin holders appear safe to me. Many 1927 sets have been split already. If stored properly, I don't think there is any great risk.

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I wouldn't worry too much about 1950 / 1953. They weren't issued in sealed cases, but I'd still be very very careful about their storage and handling. Capsules might be best. I personally wouldn't split sealed cases like 1970.

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1970 are so cheap I found a set in a cracked plastic case and broke it open and kept a second set sealed up.

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On 1/11/2022 at 2:53 PM, 1949threepence said:

I agree Jon. Proofs should be treated with the utmost respect. 

yes, I was scared about that - I keep mine in an album that is PVC free, of course. But I have to say that some nice toning is going on there, lovely colours - I know it might not be for everyone but I certainly like it. Thanks

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On 1/11/2022 at 10:51 PM, Peckris 2 said:

I wouldn't worry too much about 1950 / 1953. They weren't issued in sealed cases, but I'd still be very very careful about their storage and handling. Capsules might be best. I personally wouldn't split sealed cases like 1970.

I think the 1970 to split is okay - after all no other predecimals were minted in that year so they cannot get mixed up with general circulation stuff. 

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On 1/11/2022 at 9:32 PM, Sword said:

I think it is best to store proofs in an air tight system to maintain lustre. 2x2 self adhesive coin holders appear safe to me. Many 1927 sets have been split already. If stored properly, I don't think there is any great risk.

thankyou for the help. I just wanted to know if there was any risk in storing proof coins in albums, like loss of lustre. I think I will keep my proofs in an album, some I bought as individual coins so obviously can't get a case for those. But the sets that I did buy I shall keep the coins safe in the cases. Thanks for the help!

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On 1/19/2022 at 3:46 PM, yaaseen said:

I think the 1970 to split is okay - after all no other predecimals were minted in that year so they cannot get mixed up with general circulation stuff. 

I didn't mean that - I meant that breaking proofs out of sealed plastic might not do them any good in the long run.

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21 hours ago, Peckris 2 said:

I didn't mean that - I meant that breaking proofs out of sealed plastic might not do them any good in the long run.

sorry, I get what you mean now. On 1970 proofs, I do find it hard to find a set, all the ones I have encountered are broken as I suspect it is more profitable to break them up. I might not have encountered many sets as I hunt for the varieties so just find the individual coins when I have the money.

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3 hours ago, yaaseen said:

sorry, I get what you mean now. On 1970 proofs, I do find it hard to find a set, all the ones I have encountered are broken as I suspect it is more profitable to break them up. I might not have encountered many sets as I hunt for the varieties so just find the individual coins when I have the money.

Here's someone who seems to have several sets:

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/1970-Royal-Mint-8-coin-Proof-set-/353541204797?var=0&mkevt=1&mkcid=1&mkrid=710-53481-19255-0&campid=5338268676&toolid=10044&customid=CjwKCAiA866PBhAYEiwANkIneN63Y_Dzh8MtNIVTCHFONtRqWQpNGPzxVLSMOvWoFU5eKG8pHuy3MhoCBXUQAvD_BwE

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On 1/21/2022 at 10:40 PM, Peckris 2 said:

I didn't mean that - I meant that breaking proofs out of sealed plastic might not do them any good in the long run.

I think you are just being diplomatic and I think the word is "won't" rather than "might". Any toning on bronze and copper coins is considered by collectors to be negative, and an untoned example with full lustre is much more desirable and expensive. Let's use the 1970 proof set as an example. They have gone up quite a bit in price during the last few years and are now selling for £15+. I have finally got round to buying one quite recently and it was difficult finding one with untoned bronze. Once a set is opened, it will start to tone for certain. Proof coins can easily lose their brilliance and appear misted.

Don't get me wrong. I like love coins with eye catching toning. But great toning can take decades to form and it's much more likely to happen in the original case or in a cabinet than in a plastic flip. Our ideas of what good toning looks like do change as we become more experienced. 

From a money view point, it doesn't matter much if you do split a 1970 set. (But it would be a real shame to split one with untoned bronze!). Lots of them got split and are sold separately anyway. 

There is no shortage of 1970 proof set for sale on eBay. 129 are on offer now.

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They fetched quite a premium a short time after issue along with 1972 and 1973.

They are very cheap now near fifty years on ....

 

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3 hours ago, copper123 said:

They fetched quite a premium a short time after issue along with 1972 and 1973.

They are very cheap now near fifty years on ....

 

I remember paying around £7.50 for one in the late 70s. That must be around £30 now? However I can understand their popularity - they are the only proof set of their type and were only created due to collector demand.

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14 hours ago, Peckris 2 said:

I remember paying around £7.50 for one in the late 70s. That must be around £30 now? However I can understand their popularity - they are the only proof set of their type and were only created due to collector demand.

I picked a 1972 set up for £12 not so long back , its easy worth £20 if only for the crown the rest of the coins are mostly NFC so worth having as well

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8 hours ago, copper123 said:

I picked a 1972 set up for £12 not so long back , its easy worth £20 if only for the crown the rest of the coins are mostly NFC so worth having as well

NFC ?

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nFDC I assume.

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On 1/23/2022 at 11:11 PM, Peckris 2 said:

I remember paying around £7.50 for one in the late 70s. That must be around £30 now? However I can understand their popularity - they are the only proof set of their type and were only created due to collector demand.

Over £40 using the BoE inflation calculator. 

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sorry I ment None Circulateing Coinage

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9 hours ago, copper123 said:

sorry I ment None Circulateing Coinage

In which case you don't mean "mostly" - none of the coins were for circulation.

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