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Very interesting. I do wear cotton gloves when i handle my higher grade coins, and i don't drop them. They make valid points though and got a thumbs up from me.

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I’ll  often wear one cotton glove when examining slabs (+ small bottle of isopropyl alcohol on the side).*

Great for rubbing off  any fingerprints or crud prior to closer examination and before putting away. I find it more convenient than a loose cloth.

*There’s a Spinal Tap album cover title in there somewhere

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7 hours ago, PWA 1967 said:

Why We Don't Wear White Gloves When Handling Rare Coins | Baldwins Coins - YouTube

Something a bit different and people have opinions about , after reading  posts on here over the years.

 

 

Yes, I saw it the other day - though of course being dealers they are less fussed about long-term degradation of coins via surface contamination (the coins have long ago been sold by the time that would have an effect), but granted, edge knocks are an immediate effect for anyone! Provided the trays are wide enough that they can fully get their fingers around the edges of the coin before picking it up, that's pretty important. otherwise it's almost unavoidable for fingers to intrude over the rim.

I did raise my eyebrows when they mentioned that wisps of cotton fabric from cotton gloves could cause hairlines. I can't ever see how that could happen!

Also it depends on the metal - lustrous copper or bronze need a lot more care in handling than say, toned silver or gold.

Edited by oldcopper
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One problem with cotton gloves is that they don't come in enough different sizes. The gloves I get are usually too big for my hands and this can make handling more difficult.

I think there is no point wearing gloves when picking up hammered coins by the edge. There is probably enough "stuff" on the edges since the items have been around for hundreds of years already.

The main concern from the video about wearing gloves is the added risk of dropping the coin and causing edge knocks. Surely, this danger can be eliminated by using a decent padded surface when examining coins just in case of accidents? 

Would you want to handle a rare plain edge proof with bare hands? You probably wouldn't if you consider the edge to be the third surface of a coin. 

I think it would be a good idea to use a little air blower remove dust or lint from surfaces on lustrous coins. 

 

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Neil Paisley is now MD of Baldwins? Wow, I missed that. When did he leave Colin Cooke?

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He was appointed MD of Baldwins in 2016 and left the running of Colin Cooke to Lee Brownson.

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2 minutes ago, Sword said:

He was appointed MD of Baldwins in 2016 and left the running of Colin Cooke to Lee Brownson.

I'm way out of date..

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5 hours ago, mrbadexample said:

They need to learn a bit about which words require a capital letter. This sort of writing does my head in. :rolleyes:

Agreed. It's like reading German. Capital Letters all over the Place does my Head in.

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Interesting video.

I don't wear gloves when handling coins, and I very much take on hoard the points made about dexterity and cotton fibres. As long as you hold the coin by its edge, you shouldn't really go too far wrong. Although with that said, it's easy to occasionally somehow mishandle the coin and for it to drop into the palm of your hand. Also, I only handle mine in a "protected" environment. So if I did drop one, it would only fall onto the sofa/carpet, and so not sustain an edge knock.

I think it's also important to have sufficient room in the trays to be able to pick the coins out easily. Otherwise it might be an idea to use a pencil to ease them out to an angle where it's easier to get hold of them safely. Might be advisable with thinner coins anyway. The thick pre 1860 copper pennies are a doddle to pick up safely when there is sufficient room to do so.  

One thing I've noted with uncirculated coins is that it's easy to see which ones have just turned up somewhere and which ones have been in a collection. The edges of those that have been in a collection are invariably dark and have long since lost their lustre. For example my virtually BU 1902 LT penny has a dark lustreless edge. By contrast the 1897 high tide I bought at the beginning of this year, is also almost BU, and so it its edge. That indicates to me that it probably hasn't been in a collection, or at least not for long.   

With specific regard to microfibres, one thing I've noticed is the tiny bits of debris which can land on a coin's surface, and only show up under powerful magnification. They can easily be brushed away by wafting with a soft cloth.        

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8 minutes ago, PWA 1967 said:

https://www.baldwin.co.uk/news/to-slab-or-not-to-slab-that-is-the-question/

Another from Baldwin , Anti - Slabbers please tick the box 😀

Notice how they have changed the Capital letters ....Just for you Jon 👍

Was very pleased to see from the poll that most voters don't like slabbing.......

 

slabbing poll.PNG

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1 hour ago, 1949threepence said:

Otherwise it might be an idea to use a pencil to ease them out

A wooden tooth pick is perfect.

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