Jump to content
British Coin Forum - Predecimal.com

50 Years of RotographicCoinpublications.com A Rotographic Imprint. Price guide reference book publishers since 1959. Lots of books on coins, banknotes and medals. Please visit and like Coin Publications on Facebook for offers and updates.

Coin Publications on Facebook

   Rotographic    

The current range of books. Click the image above to see them on Amazon (printed and Kindle format). More info on coinpublications.com

predecimal.comPredecimal.com. One of the most popular websites on British pre-decimal coins, with hundreds of coins for sale, advice for beginners and interesting information.

UPINSMOKE

1917 Sixpences Grading

Recommended Posts

I recently picked up 2 1917 Sixpences. One from DNW Auctions and the other off eBay. Would like some help with grading please as I am struggling to ascertain whether I am seeing a weak strike or that they are worn through circulation. Any help would be much appreciated please. Although I have been collecting now for nearly 4 years I still have a lot too learn. I have attempted to grade each one and would appreciate you feedback.

This one I have from DNW and have gone for GEF or even possibly AUNC am I close.

 833160789_1917GeorgeVSixpenceD18692BRev-tile.thumb.jpg.de5cf3794778d0a8e1c10aa3a24d03f7.jpg

And this one off eBay as NEF although the blotchy toning on the Obv is a bit off putting.

304411836_1917SixpenceReveBay10-03-21-tile.thumb.jpg.46a69c485952aa514ac8aa54d8286f00.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I won't comment on the second, but... the first is about as good as it gets. Yes, I know the obverse only looks EF but that's pretty standard for 1917 6d's - the dies were wearing, and it's very very difficult to get a good one. I'd rate it GEF?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, Peckris 2 said:

I won't comment on the second, but... the first is about as good as it gets. Yes, I know the obverse only looks EF but that's pretty standard for 1917 6d's - the dies were wearing, and it's very very difficult to get a good one. I'd rate it GEF?

Thanks for your thoughts on the first coin, I was thinking about the same. As for the second one well I paid far more than I wanted for that one. Then the first one came up in DWN. Sods law just like bus you wait ages for one, then two come along at the same time.😃 I don't mind your comment on the second one, just wanted opinions on grade and condition, so won't be offended whatsoever. Its a good learning curve to get other views.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 hours ago, UPINSMOKE said:

Thanks for your thoughts on the first coin, I was thinking about the same. As for the second one well I paid far more than I wanted for that one. Then the first one came up in DWN. Sods law just like bus you wait ages for one, then two come along at the same time.😃 I don't mind your comment on the second one, just wanted opinions on grade and condition, so won't be offended whatsoever. Its a good learning curve to get other views.

I'd rate the second maybe VF or GVF at the most? However, being 1917, it's probably only had the circulation of an EF coin. It's the brown marks that put me right off it.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
37 minutes ago, Peckris 2 said:

I'd rate the second maybe VF or GVF at the most? However, being 1917, it's probably only had the circulation of an EF coin. It's the brown marks that put me right off it.

I agree the rather mottled effect of the toning is very off putting. Just wondered if dipping the coin would improve the look or not. 🙄☹️

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

A-UNC and NEF from me second is in similar grade really but less desireable  due to week strike and stains

Edited by copper123
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would distinguish wear from weak striking by the loss of lustre. With regard to the second example, practically all the lustre is gone (from what I can tell from the photos) and so it is really difficult to distinguish between the two. As such, I think technical grading is not important relatively to eye appeal and the actual amount of details remaining. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yikes, strike issues as per normal on these two with the first much better in AUish IMO grade a 55/58. The second soft with wear and tone and rim ding that might merit a "details" grade but net VF35 or gVF....

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Like the other posts I have difficulty in grading early George IV silver coins. When all else fails I suggest examination of the milling as that always seems to be deeply struck and an early indication of wear.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just found a picture in my archive of another 1917 sixpence which I must have owned (or maybe still do if only I knew where). It's a slightly better strike than the one I sold at DNW.

D1869.jpg

  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's an absolute corker and would attract a hefty premium IMO.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, ozjohn said:

Yes, both pretty weak, but that's usually the norm.  I looked at the three on the PCGS website and all three are weak even though they have been given MS66, MS66 and MS67+.  Heritage have previously sold a nice looking MS65 with a good obverse strike, but there aren't that many around.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, and through the plastic of the slab the weak strike is less visible,

and they charge people for this 'service'.....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry about the 1976 error a silly typo.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×