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Posted (edited)

3 .glyph?

Edited by blakeyboy
oop
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3. lightweight?

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Yes - Glyph is the answer I have for 3. "Lightweight" isn't ALL long letters.

 

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1 hour ago, Paddy said:

That's not answering the need to be all tall letters - tall letters are b, d, f, g, h, j. k. l, p, q, t, y.

 

Right. 

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1 hour ago, secret santa said:

Onomatopoeia ?

That does 4 consecutive vowels - my answer has 5. Getting closer.

 

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23 hours ago, 1949threepence said:

1/ What common English verb becomes its own past tense by rearranging its letters? SOLVED

2/ It occurs once in a minute, twice in a moment, but never in an hour. SOLVED

3/ A cowboy rides into town on Monday. He stays three days, then rides out of town on Monday. How?

4/ How was the October record set in March?

3. His horse is called Monday?

 

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9 hours ago, Paddy said:

A few word puzzles for some brief diversion. All answers are in the English dictionary and cannot be hyphenated:

1. What is the longest word that can be typed on the top letter row of a UK keyboard?

2. What is the longest word with no tall letters (above the line like l, or below like g)? (All lower case.)

3. What is the longest word with ALL tall letters?

4. What words contain all the vowels just once each in alphabetical order? (Two answers.)

5. Which word contains the most consonants in a row?

6. Which word has the most vowels in a row?

7. What word contains the letters WKW together in that order?

8. I think there is a word that contains all the vowels just once each in reverse order, but I can't remember it!

Some easier than others!

 

 

 

4. facetious

5. rhythm ? (y may not count as a consonant here)

7. awkward

 

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20 hours ago, Paddy said:

A few word puzzles for some brief diversion. All answers are in the English dictionary and cannot be hyphenated:

1. What is the longest word that can be typed on the top letter row of a UK keyboard? - Typewriter

2. What is the longest word with no tall letters (above the line like l, or below like g)? (All lower case.) (I have 11 letters.)

3. What is the longest word with ALL tall letters? - Glyph

4. What words contain all the vowels just once each in alphabetical order? (Two answers.) - Facetious, Abstemious

5. Which word contains the most consonants in a row? (Excluding Y when used as a vowel - I have 6.)

6. Which word has the most vowels in a row? (Common English word, I have 5.)

7. What word contains the letters WKW together in that order? - Awkward

8. I think there is a word that contains all the vowels just once each in reverse order, but I can't remember it!

Some easier than others!

 

 

 

Well done Chris, knocked off another one with "Awkward". Rhythm, as you suspected, doesn't really count as the Y is being used as a vowel. Facetious had already been got.

Above is the current answer situation.

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42 minutes ago, secret santa said:

Queueing ?

Bingo - but there is no second E - Queuing is the 5 letter answer I had in mind.

 

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I did some research on number 8, and leaving aside a whole tranche of scientific terms, came up with a few strong everyday words:

Subcontinental

Uncomplimentary

Unnoticeably

 

 

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2 hours ago, Paddy said:

Bingo - but there is no second E - Queuing is the 5 letter answer I had in mind.

 

By which you mean there IS a second E. Otherwise it's only 4. ;)

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3 hours ago, Paddy said:

Well done Chris, knocked off another one with "Awkward".

Scroll up to my "Hawkwind" post! :p

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4 minutes ago, mrbadexample said:

By which you mean there IS a second E. Otherwise it's only 4. ;)

Whoops!

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3 hours ago, Paddy said:

Bingo - but there is no second E - Queuing is the 5 letter answer I had in mind.

I think both spellings can be used but queuing has got more popular in recent decades. "Queueing can also be used as the continuous form" according to online Collins dictionary.

Frequency in which the two spelling occur in books over the year.

qu.thumb.jpg.9f1a2befff2e278ddfe8eb2868d59e24.jpg

 

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I am just hopeless with word puzzles. Long live logic and calculation challenges! 

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Posted (edited)

An old puzzle. You have one or more ice cubes in a glass of water. You use a pen to mark the initial water level. Then you let the ice melt completely. Would the new water level be higher or lower then before? (The red wordings read "original water level")

162925608_1-Copy.jpg.955ef46944fef32e4f900cdc9b201bf4.jpg

 

Edited by Sword

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5 minutes ago, Sword said:

An old puzzle. You have one or more ice cubes in a glass of water. You use a pen to mark the initial water level. Then you let the ice melt completely. Would the new water level be higher or lower then before? (The red wordings read "original water level")

162925608_1-Copy.jpg.955ef46944fef32e4f900cdc9b201bf4.jpg

 

Lots of factors here. Apparently ice expands about 9% when it freezes, but ice also floats with about 10% above the surface in sea-water, so I am going to assume that in fresh water these cancel out as the ice melts so the final level is unchanged.
 

Jerry

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Would it stay exactly the same though since everyone is worried about raising sea levels due to the melting of ice caps?

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I believe in principle it would stay exactly the same. The small portion of the cubes that were above the surface correspond to the reduced density of the ice, but once melted the density is the same as the rest of the water, and so occupies a reduced volume.

The only factor that might bring about a small change is the presence of small air bubbles in the ice, which, once released, would lower the level very slightly.

The melting ice-caps issue relates to all the ice on land.

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4 minutes ago, Paddy said:

I believe in principle it would stay exactly the same. The small portion of the cubes that were above the surface correspond to the reduced density of the ice, but once melted the density is the same as the rest of the water, and so occupies a reduced volume.

The only factor that might bring about a small change is the presence of small air bubbles in the ice, which, once released, would lower the level very slightly.

The melting ice-caps issue relates to all the ice on land.

Exactly.

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A related and simpler problem. You are in a boat with a lead weight. (See diagram. Imagine you are standing next to the weight).  The Initial level of water was noted. You throw the lead weight overboard so that it sink to the bottom. What would happen to the water level?

2142853163_puzzle-Copy.thumb.jpg.0eeebeed505bb785c7dfd7c731f9146a.jpg

 

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The water level will fall. The volume of water displaced by the boat carrying the weight is greater than the volume of the weight itself and the rise of the empty boat will cause the water level to drop.

Jerry

 

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