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We could always take the French approach - move the decimal point a couple of places to the left. Then the old pound becomes a Penny and the new pound is equivalent to 100 old pounds. Effectively winds the clock back about 100 years in terms of buying power...

I am only joking!

 

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11 hours ago, Peckris 2 said:

So we should wave bye bye to both bronzes (er, steel!) as both are worth less than the 1961 farthing. Charities may complain but frankly I'm more likely to put 5p or more in a tin than coins that make me look like a miserly cheapskate.

I would however hate to lose something called a "penny" so what do people suggest might get round this?

Revalue the currency so that a "new" penny became worth about 50p. Obviously we'd need completely new currency. 

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Looks like we are stuck with the old design for the Brexit 50p - just the date changed:

https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-politics-51250753

Also some indication of mintage given - if they are right at 10M these will not be a scarce coin!

 

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Bo Jo quite understandably would want everyone to handle the 50p commemorating his handiwork. 10 million sounds about right.

 

 

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On 1/18/2020 at 10:15 AM, Sword said:

I find low denomination coins from 20p downwards fairly pointless these days. They worth little and have a habit of accumulating in the pocket or jar at home. I like contactless payment for low amounts just to avoid having to carry the weight of loose change. I would rather think it is a good idea to scrap the 5p, 2p, 1p coins. 

Shopkeepers like myself would disagree. Contactless payments of small amounts hit us directly in the pocket. Banks charge us a  transaction fee for every contactless payment reducing our profits significantly.

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57 minutes ago, hazelman said:

Shopkeepers like myself would disagree. Contactless payments of small amounts hit us directly in the pocket. Banks charge us a  transaction fee for every contactless payment reducing our profits significantly.

That's a shame but I will continue with Contact-less as it's far and away most convenient.

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1 hour ago, hazelman said:

Shopkeepers like myself would disagree. Contactless payments of small amounts hit us directly in the pocket. Banks charge us a  transaction fee for every contactless payment reducing our profits significantly.

I don't think this will be an issue once contactless payment becomes the norm for all small amounts. The retailers will then simply factor the transaction fees into the retail prices. (Hopefully, fees will also be lower if there are more contactless transactions assuming the banks don't get too greedy)

For example, a shop selling suits expect nearly everyone to pay with card, and so the retail prices have already factored in the card fees.

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2 minutes ago, Sword said:

I don't think this will be an issue once contactless payment becomes the norm for all small amounts. The retailers will then simply factor the transaction fees into the retail prices. (Hopefully, fees will also be lower if there are more contactless transactions assuming the banks don't get too greedy)

For example, a shop selling suits expect nearly everyone to pay with card, and so the retail prices have already factored in the card fees.

Agreed.As mine is a small convenience store near a college many of my customers are students often purchasing soft drinks and crisps etc. My products are all price marked perhaps the suppliers will start factoring in this cost when deciding on their prices.

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Sir Philip Pullman is  protesting about the Brexit 50p coin. He is complaining that the "Oxford comma" is missing from the coin's wording: "Peace, prosperity and friendship with all nations."

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-51269012

It's the first time I have heard of the term "Oxford comma" which is a comma in front of the word "and".

I was taught at school that comma is optional and I have never used it myself. Let's do a poll on the number of people for and against this comma. Wouldn't it be funny if it is an ironic 48:52 split. :)  

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"We used to eat fish, chips, peas and blancmange on a Friday"

as opposed to

"We used to eat fish, chips, peas, and blancmange on a Friday"

The second sentence has an Oxford comma after "peas". Without it, you could infer that we ate "peas and blancmange" 😖. Obviously it's not always necessary, but there are times when it is.

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I tend to use it when a slight pause in the continuity would sound better if spoken.

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3 hours ago, Sword said:

Sir Philip Pullman is  protesting about the Brexit 50p coin. He is complaining that the "Oxford comma" is missing from the coin's wording: "Peace, prosperity and friendship with all nations."

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-51269012

It's the first time I have heard of the term "Oxford comma" which is a comma in front of the word "and".

I was taught at school that comma is optional and I have never used it myself. Let's do a poll on the number of people for and against this comma. Wouldn't it be funny if it is an ironic 48:52 split. :)  

If you didn't go to Oxford why use it unless you are trying to impress. I was taught at school to put a comma between the list words and not after the last word on the list in front of the and.

 I was also  taught not to start a sentence with an and or but however we spent many hours in analysing sentences into  pronouns , prepositions, verbs, nouns, adverb clauses, subjunctive clauses etc.

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12 hours ago, Sword said:

Sir Philip Pullman is  protesting about the Brexit 50p coin. He is complaining that the "Oxford comma" is missing from the coin's wording: "Peace, prosperity and friendship with all nations."

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-51269012

It's the first time I have heard of the term "Oxford comma" which is a comma in front of the word "and".

I was taught at school that comma is optional and I have never used it myself. Let's do a poll on the number of people for and against this comma. Wouldn't it be funny if it is an ironic 48:52 split. :)  

Lets face it, he is just being an awkward twit to get himself in the news.

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19 hours ago, Sword said:

Sir Philip Pullman is  protesting about the Brexit 50p coin. He is complaining that the "Oxford comma" is missing from the coin's wording: "Peace, prosperity and friendship with all nations."

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-51269012

It's the first time I have heard of the term "Oxford comma" which is a comma in front of the word "and".

I was taught at school that comma is optional and I have never used it myself. Let's do a poll on the number of people for and against this comma. Wouldn't it be funny if it is an ironic 48:52 split. :)  

It doesn't need an Oxford comma. The full meaning is already crystal clear with no possible confusion. 

Anyway, that's his opinion. 99.9% of the population will not care either way..................unless, as a result of his complaint, a few (say 2000) get minted with an Oxford comma and released into circulation. Then Sir Philip might experience an unexpected surge of popularity amongst coin enthusiasts. Hey, I just throw that one out there as a wildcard.      

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18 hours ago, Peckris 2 said:

"We used to eat fish, chips, peas and blancmange on a Friday"

as opposed to

"We used to eat fish, chips, peas, and blancmange on a Friday"

The second sentence has an Oxford comma after "peas". Without it, you could infer that we ate "peas and blancmange" 😖. Obviously it's not always necessary, but there are times when it is.

"We used to eat fish, chips and peas on a Friday, followed by blancmange" 

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2 hours ago, 1949threepence said:

It doesn't need an Oxford comma. The full meaning is already crystal clear with no possible confusion. 

Anyway, that's his opinion. 99.9% of the population will not care either way..................unless, as a result of his complaint, a few (say 2000) get minted with an Oxford comma and released into circulation. Then Sir Philip might experience an unexpected surge of popularity amongst coin enthusiasts. Hey, I just throw that one out there as a wildcard.      

I do not object to the Oxford comma (although I wouldn't use it on this occasion). I just object to the word "all". 

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What I meant was that the statement isn't true today, won't be true on the 31st and will not come true in the foreseeable future. It cannot be achieved by Brexit or by remaining in the EU. 

History tell us that we will unfortunately have to go to war in the future. There will always be governments we will not be on friendly terms with. How can we ever claim prosperity with all nations when there are so many human beings living in proverty.

Hence, I said that the phrase "Commenoration of Brexit" would be better as it is direct and to the point. "Peace, prosperity and friendship with all nations" just sounds pretentious.

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They're tryinmg to create a non-divisive coin without the word brexit on.

Trouble is, they've done something really cheesy instead of actually commemrating the UK leaving the EU. Whatever they do for it, the remoaners will be critical, and with the current design so will anyone who likes coins or wants to pick faults.

Whatever, I'm still off to the mint tomorrow to get me one in a Jan31/2020 pack in the one-day only event.

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The prices are finally out on the Royal Mint site:

                                                Price    LEP
Gold Proof                            £945.00    1500
Silver Proof                           £60.00    47000
Brilliant Uncirculated           £10.00    Unlimited
Two-coin set                         £30.00    5000
Strike on the Day Sovereign £800.00    1500

A number of gold Sovereigns will be struck on the day and these particular coins will feature a portcullis privy mark.

I really want to get a BU example. It will however cost me 50p as I will get one from post office or bank or circulation 😀 As usual, I prefer to collect a currency coin than a proof.

 

 

 

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I'm hoping all th eoffended remainers will bury/melt/destroy many of them thus reducing the number to scare :)

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Noted on the Daily Telegraph online just over a day to Brexit and still counting.

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16 minutes ago, Unwilling Numismatist said:

I'm hoping all th eoffended remainers will bury/melt/destroy many of them thus reducing the number to scare :)

Scare? Dream on!

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43 minutes ago, Unwilling Numismatist said:

I'm hoping all th eoffended remainers will bury/melt/destroy many of them thus reducing the number to scare :)

Drop your trousers and I'll oblige.

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@SwordWith (allegedly) 50 million remainers, and (I say this with a wry smile) ONLY 10 million in circulation, it shouldn't take long :)

And no, @Peckris 2 I won't oblige.

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9 hours ago, Unwilling Numismatist said:

And no, @Peckris 2 I won't oblige.

Of course you wouldn't. Destroying 50p coins is also a silly thing that people won't do either. :-)

There are however reports that some people won't accept them; Alastair Campbell because he doesn't believe in the slogan, and Philip Pullman said it should be "boycotted by all literate people". Hence, you have an even bigger chance of building a hoard if you want to.

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