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Unwilling Numismatist

50p, the actual numbers so far....

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9 hours ago, Paddy said:

I think there are a lot more 50p collectors than 100,000. I do the local markets regularly and I have at least a dozen really serious collectors and dozens more trying to get sets together for their children/grandchildren. Jemima Puddleduck at 2.1 million does not seem common enough to fill all these collections as I am constantly asked for it. With the even lower mintages for most of the 2018 50ps expect a blood bath!

Part of the problem is a lot of the collectors for children/grandchildren want to get more than one complete set. I have one regular who is trying to get 5 sets of all the 50ps AND the £2s AND the old £1s! Very good business for me, but hard work keeping up with all their needs.

 

I really thought most dealers hated dealing with people selling a few 2016 peter rabbit coins and wanting a tenner each for then.

You seem to one of the few thats embraced dealing in decimals .

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7 hours ago, secret santa said:

The key question is "when we go cashless, is the interest in real coins going to fade away or get a boost through their rarity ?"

If we ever go cashless.....

....don't think it'll make that much difference. People will still collect coins as icons of a bygone age.

I hope we don't go completely cashless, although I accept there are those who are strongly pressing for us to go down that road, regardless of other's opinions. It irritates me that so many things are now enforced as cashless. Even the canteen at work has now gone cashless, with payment by contactless or via one of those infernal and vastly overrated "apps". 

Being able to pay by notes and coins is quite possibly the last bastion of true personal anonymity we have. 

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28 minutes ago, 1949threepence said:

If we ever go cashless.....

....don't think it'll make that much difference. People will still collect coins as icons of a bygone age.

I hope we don't go completely cashless, although I accept there are those who are strongly pressing for us to go down that road, regardless of other's opinions. It irritates me that so many things are now enforced as cashless. Even the canteen at work has now gone cashless, with payment by contactless or via one of those infernal and vastly overrated "apps". 

Being able to pay by notes and coins is quite possibly the last bastion of true personal anonymity we have. 

I agree, and particularly I feel "going cashless" represents the ultimate victory for the big-brother nanny state we now find ourselves living in. If everything is done on a card, the banks and by extension the government and anyone else bothered to find out, know exactly where we are and what we are doing all of the time. 

At that point I think I will go and find some jungle to live in somewhere, miles form this dysfunctional world!

  

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6 minutes ago, Paddy said:

I agree, and particularly I feel "going cashless" represents the ultimate victory for the big-brother nanny state we now find ourselves living in. If everything is done on a card, the banks and by extension the government and anyone else bothered to find out, know exactly where we are and what we are doing all of the time. 

At that point I think I will go and find some jungle to live in somewhere, miles form this dysfunctional world!

  

If there is any left

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26 minutes ago, copper123 said:

If there is any left

I'd be happy with any atlantic or pacific rock large enough to support a couple of banana trees and some large grasses while I research Darwins experiments...

 

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10 hours ago, secret santa said:

The key question is "when we go cashless, is the interest in real coins going to fade away or get a boost through their rarity ?"

Interesting question. The parallel - yet not - situation is vinyl records: when CDs came in, record collecting became popular and prices went through the roof for rarities. However, there has also been a resurgence in vinyl releases as there was always a hardcore minority who preferred it and their numbers have swollen. There won't be the same thing with coins except for the minority who collect; there will be no resurgence of coins as a money medium when and if we go cashless.

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2 hours ago, Paddy said:

I agree, and particularly I feel "going cashless" represents the ultimate victory for the big-brother nanny state we now find ourselves living in. If everything is done on a card, the banks and by extension the government and anyone else bothered to find out, know exactly where we are and what we are doing all of the time.

Not a good observation. It wasn't 'the nanny state' that has seen the rise of cashless. It was international banking that first introduced the credit then the debit card. Apps and contactless are the work of banks and multinational computing companies. Do we REALLY believe that Britain has had any real influence or dynamic input in this whole thing?

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I was not saying the nanny state created the move towards a cashless society, but they sure as hell will take full advantage of it!

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It is the state that will finally determine whether we do become “cashless”,  as the state is responsible via the RM and BOE for producing the actual cash that we use. There is undoubtedly a drive by the banks towards cashless, driven by improved technology, rapid processing    ability and potential efficiency savings, ie greater profitability, and probably a certain perceived benefit to government by reduction in tax evasion potential from cashless. But while the government do continue to produce ‘legal tender’ currency  and facilitate its distribution and usage, there will always be a significant proportion of the population that find it useful in many situations. A country could unilaterally become cashless, but this would have to be with government supervision and support, and with a great deal of national preparation to protect particularly the vulnerable in society.

Jerry

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1 hour ago, jelida said:

A country could unilaterally become cashless, but this would have to be with government supervision and support, and with a great deal of national preparation to protect particularly the vulnerable in society.

In a way, that's what is happening. The young now use contactless without a second's thought, while many of the elderly still use cash as their prime option. Meanwhile cheques are seeing the slowest death by a 1000 cuts but will before long be history. A slow changeover to suit different generations is what we're getting.

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1 hour ago, Peckris 2 said:

In a way, that's what is happening. The young now use contactless without a second's thought, while many of the elderly still use cash as their prime option. Meanwhile cheques are seeing the slowest death by a 1000 cuts but will before long be history. A slow changeover to suit different generations is what we're getting.

Of course the other main driver of society possibly going cashless (and maybe even shopless) is the massive rise in internet shopping. 

Jerry is spot on about protecting the vulnerable - the only problem being the rise in the number of outlets who opt to no longer accept cash. Often an excuse as they find handling cash time consuming and inconvenient. However, as long as the government compel banks to accept it, there will always be an acceptance of money, especially among small traders for whom it provides a foolproof tax dodge. 

Edited by 1949threepence
Irritating insertion of unasked for words by my phone, rendering one sentence unintelligible
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9 hours ago, 1949threepence said:

 However, as long as the government compel banks to accept it, there will always be an acceptance of money, especially among small traders for whom it provides a foolproof tax dodge. 

"Twenty five notes John, twenty for cash..."

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I bet Chisholm will find out.

 

 

A V.A.T. on the slate please Dave....

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On 11/18/2019 at 11:01 PM, Peckris 2 said:

"Twenty five notes John, twenty for cash..."

The number of cheap b&b s I have stoped in where the hosts eyes light up when you present cash ........

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You ain't seen me.... right?

Edited by blakeyboy
mispeling
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Funny enough a lot of the early 50p coins from 2010 and b4 are really hard to find in great condition and because all the publicity goes on the recent ones they only sell for a couple of pounds each  a totally daft and disfunctional world yes

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Indeed, and even more weird is the 2019 Kew from Westminster, blue carded and cheapish .. selling fore 20-25 quid to eejits on ebay. Why don't they got to westminster and buy their own lol.

Edited by Unwilling Numismatist
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Given the number of people collecting 50ps, and the availability of information about them to non-collectors via the internet, do you think we will ever see (for example) a Kew Gardens 50p in Fine? :huh:

Edited by mrbadexample

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On 12/13/2019 at 7:40 PM, mrbadexample said:

Given the number of people collecting 50ps, and the availability of information about them to non-collectors via the internet, do you think we will ever see (for example) a Kew Gardens 50p in Fine? :huh:

Possible, but unlikely.

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