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craigy

have you seen the price of a kew gardens ?

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21 hours ago, blakeyboy said:

How many times on an antiques programme has a piece of silver been seen with the hallmark polished out???

I pop curio coins that I want to de-polish into my pocket, and yes, all that happens is a change in tone, and in the case of a dark bronze coin,

the high spots lighten, but that's it. To shift from UNC to VF say, would take years and years...

But wreaths did have years and years! Here's a possible scenario for several examples: reasonably well-off uncle is shown a wreath crown by his bank and decides it would make the perfect gift for his favourite nephew. Said nephew is told to keep it 'as an heirloom' (or similar) and sticks it in his money box / pocket / wallet for years and takes it out fairly regularly and gives it a good rub "to keep it shiny". Never seeing one in change or in any shop, he probably believes he may not be able to spend it easily, so passes it on to his own kids. It's a sort-of circulation but not in the way we know it Jim.

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21 hours ago, blakeyboy said:

How many times on an antiques programme has a piece of silver been seen with the hallmark polished out???

I pop curio coins that I want to de-polish into my pocket, and yes, all that happens is a change in tone, and in the case of a dark bronze coin,

the high spots lighten, but that's it. To shift from UNC to VF say, would take years and years...

I have some interest in silverware and am aware that it is not uncommon for silver pieces to lose value because the hallmarks have been blurred due to excessive polishing. The advice "be careful when polishing around hallmarks" is frequently given.

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It's probably also worth mentioning that if polished, then proprietary cleaner is likely to be used, which will in turn tarnish more readily than leaving it to tone naturally judging by the need to clean the competition cups in our club on an annual basis - which will enhance wear.........

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..and even more when in a city (- the silver contacts in audio mixing consoles need special attention in polluted air ).

 

Mind you, surely that sort of rubbing with fingers or a polishing cloth generate one type of worn surface,

and continual abrasion from pockets or being slid across shop counters generate another?

 

 

Thinking of this abrasion, and misquoting Shakespeare in Peckis' vein: 

 "To sleep, perchance to dream, is illogical, Captain - aye, there's the rub...:

 

 

"To be or not to beam me up Scotty." :)

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AHAHAHA!

Well spotted!

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On 1/14/2020 at 10:05 PM, Peckris 2 said:

But wreaths did have years and years! Here's a possible scenario for several examples: reasonably well-off uncle is shown a wreath crown by his bank and decides it would make the perfect gift for his favourite nephew. Said nephew is told to keep it 'as an heirloom' (or similar) and sticks it in his money box / pocket / wallet for years and takes it out fairly regularly and gives it a good rub "to keep it shiny". Never seeing one in change or in any shop, he probably believes he may not be able to spend it easily, so passes it on to his own kids. It's a sort-of circulation but not in the way we know it Jim.

This example is for sale in the next LCA. It's almost impossible to believe that it can get to this grade by normal "circulation". It must have been manually polished often in the past. I have never seen a wreath crown with so much wear.

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41 minutes ago, Sword said:

This example is for sale in the next LCA. It's almost impossible to believe that it can get to this grade by normal "circulation". It must have been manually polished often in the past. I have never seen a wreath crown with so much wear.

1199406759_img-Copy.thumb.jpg.c5cf024b4ca8dd10c64b474544a2f488.jpg

Yes, the wear  pattern is totally abnormal.

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1 hour ago, Peckris 2 said:

Yes, the wear  pattern is totally abnormal.

Agreed - note how the initials K.G. are still legible on the reverse despite the extreme wear. I think the polishing theory is correct - but why would someone do that ?

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7 hours ago, JLS said:

Agreed - note how the initials K.G. are still legible on the reverse despite the extreme wear. I think the polishing theory is correct - but why would someone do that ?

The previous owners obviously wanted to keep it shiny and the damage has developed over many years. The extra wear after each polishing wouldn't be noticed.

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1 hour ago, Sword said:

The previous owners obviously wanted to keep it shiny and the damage has developed over many years. The extra wear after each polishing wouldn't be noticed.

Owning a few ex-polished pieces, I wish they could stop being shiny a bit faster....

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2 hours ago, Sword said:

The previous owners obviously wanted to keep it shiny and the damage has developed over many years. The extra wear after each polishing wouldn't be noticed.

Hmmm, bizarre. I wonder how many times a year it was polished to cause that degree of wear.

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21 hours ago, JLS said:

Agreed - note how the initials K.G. are still legible on the reverse despite the extreme wear. I think the polishing theory is correct - but why would someone do that ?

A gift to a non-collector, I'd imagine.

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Another Mail article about the Kew Gardens 50p - they're now worth £85 according to Phil Mussel of Coin News - wow !!! 

link

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You'd probably get your hand bitten off at £85 Mike. I see them going on the Faceache groups for over £100.

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15 minutes ago, 1949threepence said:

Another Mail article about the Kew Gardens 50p - they're now worth £85 according to Phil Mussel of Coin News - wow !!! 

link

I tried to click on the link and was unexpectedly saved from viewing by the Daily Mail pointing out I had an ad blocker :)  The ability to surf randomly in the knowledge the DM will block me from unnecessarily viewing their articles is as good as winning the lottery. Mine's a pint.

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6 minutes ago, Rob said:

I tried to click on the link and was unexpectedly saved from viewing by the Daily Mail pointing out I had an ad blocker :)  The ability to surf randomly in the knowledge the DM will block me from unnecessarily viewing their articles is as good as winning the lottery. Mine's a pint.

hear hear, i’ve grown to detest that rag, drinks all round.

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I believe a lot of the prices are down to the Whitman type folders that RM released for the modern 50p. All easy coins to get ,except the 2009 Kew . I know the feeling of needing to fill a gap , so can understand people wanting to pay over the odds to do it. The 1992/93 EEC 50p only had a circulation of 109,000 ( I remember them in my change when I was in my teens ), but sell for half of what a Kew goes for .

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52 minutes ago, mick1271 said:

I know the feeling of needing to fill a gap

Ooh err missus. I do miss Frankie Howerd.

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3 hours ago, mrbadexample said:

You'd probably get your hand bitten off at £85 Mike. I see them going on the Faceache groups for over £100.

I thought the same, Jon. They're routinely changing hands for a lot more.  

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3 hours ago, Rob said:

I tried to click on the link and was unexpectedly saved from viewing by the Daily Mail pointing out I had an ad blocker :)  The ability to surf randomly in the knowledge the DM will block me from unnecessarily viewing their articles is as good as winning the lottery. Mine's a pint.

 

3 hours ago, Diaconis said:

hear hear, i’ve grown to detest that rag, drinks all round.

Well for those who would be offended by glimpsing a Mail article, I'll just say that it was a repeat of the usual. So no great loss. 

But it still goes to show that the coin continues to attract media attention.  

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Diaconis said:

Ooh err missus. I do miss Frankie Howerd.

oooohhh titter ye not missus

Edited by 1949threepence
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On 2/7/2020 at 12:21 AM, JLS said:

Agreed - note how the initials K.G. are still legible on the reverse despite the extreme wear. I think the polishing theory is correct - but why would someone do that ?

Indeed. It would be more usual to stick it somewhere and forget about it, rather than getting it out religiously each week, for a good polishing.

It's not like it's an ornament on the mantelpiece.

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1 hour ago, 1949threepence said:

 It would be more usual to stick it somewhere and forget about it, rather than getting it out religiously each week, for a good polishing.

 

Ooo-er Missus indeed!!!!!!!

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1 hour ago, 1949threepence said:

rather than getting it out religiously each week, for a good polishing.

This topic is turning in to a script from Finbarr Saunders and his double entendres😂

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