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ozjohn

1927 Halfcrown

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Or that it’s not a silver proof? There is definitely that coppery tinge to the obverse hi lights.

Jerry

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This coin was only issued as a proof. 15000 sets in total were issued some in leather presentation cases and others in cardboard

presentation boxes.

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Ah, I see. Well it clearly entered circulation somehow, so that is one possibility. Another is a sticky fingered child. One of my pervading childhood guilts is that I took and spent a couple of half crowns from a bag in dad’s desk. He wasn’t pleased, he had previously collected better early C20 examples from circulation . I think I managed to share the guilt with my brother though, so a small victory.

Jerry

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There were nearly 7 million of the 1927 old shield reverse issued, but as ozjohn says, only 15.000 proof versions of the new shield reverse. I bet the owner did fall on hard times. Either that or it was stolen and the thief just thought it was an ordinary halfcrown. 

The term "impaired proof" comes to mind. 

Edited by 1949threepence
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Hi Jelida,

I notice among your interests are vintage HiFi. I worked for the MO Valve Co in the 1960s where they produced the KT 66 & KT 88 tubes. I was also interested in the Williamson amplifier with the Baxandall tone control circuit that were described in the Wireless World magazine. In fact early attempts to apply circuit theory to amplifier design. Then I worked at Sydney University  where the base reflex for loud speakers was designed again using second order linear control theory to tune the response of a cavity for critical damping at the low frequency end of the audio spectrum.Have to say when it comes to modern HiFi amps VFETS do a pretty good job as they have the same transfer characteristic as vacuum tubes ie 3/2 power curve as against a transistor (BJT) that has a qv/kt transfer characteristic. Still there is something about glowing tubes and power transformers..

Hope I am not boring you.

Regards,

Ozjojn

Edited by ozjohn
typo

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2 hours ago, ozjohn said:

Hi Jelida,

I notice among your interests are vintage HiFi. I worked for the MO Valve Co in the 1960s where they produced the KT 66 & KT 88 tubes. I was also interested in the Williamson amplifier with the Baxandall tone control circuit that were described in the Wireless World magazine. In fact early attempts to apply circuit theory to amplifier design. Then I worked at Sydney University  where the base reflex for loud speakers was designed again using second order linear control theory to tune the response of a cavity for critical damping at the low frequency end of the audio spectrum.Have to say when it comes to modern HiFi amps VFETS do a pretty good job as they have the same transfer characteristic as vacuum tubes ie 3/2 power curve as against a transistor (BJT) that has a qv/kt transfer characteristic. Still there is something about glowing tubes and power transformers..

Hope I am not boring you.

Regards,

Ozjojn

Excellent! I just love vintage valve HiFi, particularly EL84 and KT66 amps, I still have a couple of dozen various makes/systems. M-O were widely considered one of the best manufacturers today, and command a premium. I am not technically particularly able, though I can generally undertake amplifier repairs. As in so many things, I am driven by the collecting bug, I also have thousands of LP’s,  several series Landrovers, many hundreds of antiquarian topography books and a very patient wife. I also collect real ale, but can never seem to hold on to it for long.

Jerry

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Your post brings back memories of the gentle hum of a valve amplifier :)

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On 7/6/2018 at 8:02 AM, ozjohn said:

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Great-Britain-Half-Crown-1927-KM-835-Silver-Proof-ChVF/382510982516?hash=item590f6e6574:g:E8sAAOSwW9FbPV1c

You can only speculate about this coin but it's a fair chance that the original owner fell on bad times during the Great Depression and was forced to spend it.

The issue price of the 1927 proof set in cardboard box was 15 shillings. Face value of the coins is 11 shillings 3d. (Information from a document posted by Gary D several years ago.) 

Hence, it would not have been a big loss for spending them if you were hard up.

 

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1 hour ago, Sword said:

The issue price of the 1927 proof set in cardboard box was 15 shillings. Face value of the coins is 11 shillings 3d. (Information from a document posted by Gary D several years ago.) 

Hence, it would not have been a big loss for spending them if you were hard up.

I'm more drawn to the sticky-fingered child theory. I find it harder to envisage a collector buying a proof set (which had to be applied for, by the way) then spending it especially when you consider that coin collecting was not an arena for the working classes of that time.

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I guess it depends on how hungry you are. Something we are not so familiar with nowadays.

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Has anyone seen the 1927 Proof halfcrown in gold coming up at heritage?

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Yes indeed, breaks my heart that I don't have the means for that one.

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and the threepence you mentioned in a previous thread is up too, gonna go for that one and be competition for me? ;)

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No. Out of it. Good luck though....

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On 7/9/2018 at 5:47 PM, rpeddie said:

and the threepence you mentioned in a previous thread is up too, gonna go for that one and be competition for me? ;)

what 3d you on about ?

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Coins went for:

 

1838 gold threepence   16.8k USD plus 20%  =  20.15k

 

1927 gold half crown  72k USD plus 20%!! juice = 87k

 

Broke my heart to not be able to compete, but WAAAAY too Rich!

 

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1927 Gold Halfcrown was 60,000 + 12000 juice - $72,000 😉

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On 8/19/2018 at 6:26 PM, VickySilver said:

Coins went for:

1838 gold threepence   16.8k USD plus 20%  =  20.15k

 

I kinda figured about 16.5k for this, but the 20% didn't even cross my mind.
Glad I wan't the buyer in that sense....  :)

 

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I saw a 1920 or 1922 gold florin a few years ago at a Sydney coin fair. I was told at the time it was struck by  the RM as a sample for Egypt.

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Yes, that would be 1922. As the article by Graham stated, they were of different gold alloy (and different weigh, thickness, etc.) and were tests for the alloy of the Egyptian series - the accepted alloy was an 0.875 gold/silver that was counterstamped with an "A" on the reverse near the rim.

What were they asking price wise? In light of this half crown, I would have to guess at least 40k USD.

Edited by VickySilver

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