Jump to content
British Coin Forum - Predecimal.com

50 Years of RotographicCoinpublications.com A Rotographic Imprint. Price guide reference book publishers since 1959. Lots of books on coins, banknotes and medals. Please visit and like Coin Publications on Facebook for offers and updates.

Coin Publications on Facebook

   Rotographic    

The current range of books. Click the image above to see them on Amazon (printed and Kindle format). More info on coinpublications.com

predecimal.comPredecimal.com. One of the most popular websites on British pre-decimal coins, with hundreds of coins for sale, advice for beginners and interesting information.

1949threepence

Will we ever become a cashless society?

Recommended Posts

Someone once posted this in a forum, it's worth posting here too! 

Me. "Hello"
Random Bloke (RB) "Good morning sir how are you today?"
Me "Itchy"
RB ".....Ok.....do you know your Windows computer has been sending out random messages for the last two weeks?"
Me "Really?"
RB "Yes sir, do you have a few minutes and I'll help you fix it?"
Me "Thats rather splendid of you"
RB "Will you turn your computer on, I'll give you a few minutes"
Me "Its on"
RB "Its on now?"
Me "Yes it starts instantly"
RB "Can you see your desktop with all the icons?"
ME " I don't have any icons on my desktop, they make me feel itchy"
RB ".....OK.....On the bottom left of your keyboard there a ctrl key, can you see it?"
Me "Yes"
RB "Can you tell me what key is to the right of it?"
Me " alt"
RB "And to the right of that?"
Me "cmd"
RB "No, no , no, sir at the bottom left of the keyboard is a ctrl key, what is to the right of it?"
Me "alt"

RB "And beside it?"

Me "fn and alt"
RB "You should be able to see a key with the Windows symbol on it"
Me "Nope"
RB "Its next to the ctrl Key"
Me "Nope"
RB "There's no Windows key?"
Me "Nope, its a Mac and they don't have a Windows key"

RB "Its a Mac?"

Me "Yep"
RB ".....Ok.....can you go onto Google for me?"
Me "Nope"
RB "You just need to go onto the internet with Safari and go to Google"
Me "Can't"
RB "Can I ask why?"
Me "Yes"
RB ".........You can't go on Google?"
Me "Nope"
RB "Why not?"
Me "I'm not connected to the internet, it makes me feel itchy"

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Paddy said:

... ah but by saying "may" they give themselves a let out cause. If it is in their interests to find a recording of the call, they will do. If it is in YOUR interest, then that call was conveniently not recorded. Murphy's law applies.

 

Spot on Paddy. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Peckris said:

My calls to HMRC or DWP invariably begin with me saying "This call is being recorded for quality and monitoring purposes". :lol:

The calls that really infuriate me are when someone calls ME and then says "I'm going to take you through some security questions before proceeding with the main reason for the call." I always reply by saying "Hold on a moment - YOU called ME. You prove you are who who you say you are or I'm not answering any of your so-called security questions."

Indeed, they are not only infuriating, but also totally incomprehensible. Surely, surely, any organisational management with even half a brain, must know that confronting the public with such inane questions on an outgoing call, is going to wind them up, and accordingly arrange any outbound campaign to exclude any questions which might give rise to having to ask questions which require data protection laws to come into effect (GDPR now)   

Or write to them.

Or arrange for all customers to have a reverse means of identification - eg: they have a password which they ask the caller of the organisation concerned to say before the call is proceeded with. Security is two way, not one.

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Your last bit Mike about the company having a password is the one Mike ,I owned call centres and had sixty thousand business customers that we continued to look after the intitial sale and build a relationship with.

Unfortunately we had that big a share of the market that competitors phoned up saying they were us as an easy introduction and assumptive.

We therefore had passwords to ensure both parties were familiar with each other before the call was continued :)....So yes secutity works both ways.

However in the early days when we had know customers being polite ,courteous and listening to what the persons business wanted worked quite well :)

Not all call centres tell lies and try to have people over and most reputable ones have a phone system that will record everything (even if the call is unanswered ) ,although the costs involved are high especially if you have hundreds of lines.The regulators should monitor the smaller groups of telesales teams just as much who in some cases have know other interest than making a quick few quid and are happy to lie to get it.

All good fun and the choice is our own as to weather we listen or not.

Pete.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I rue the day we become a totally cashless society. It's bad enough as it is imo (nuff said). With disbelief, I witnessed first hand the distressing effects on a couple of Greek friends with whom I was working in the US in 2016. The financial crisis hit home and from one day to the other they had no access to funds, their bank accounts were frozen and their credit cards were blocked. Technically, 'someone' decided to  render them penniless overnight. Luckily for them they were not stuck in Greece at the time where no-one could buy anything without cash.

I see it as relinquishing power to someone who has no regard for who I am, in which situation I am and views me purely as a cow to milk. 'They' would have the power to sentence me to a life of penury without recourse.  They could incite chaos and anarchy at the push of a button so to speak. No thanks. With cash in pocket we have the power to make at least some decisions and choices if the etherial pot of electronic money ever decides to go pop again. Call me paranoid, a Luddite, or more appropriately here maybe, a Ramage if you will, but I honestly believe that it should be resisted at all cost.

That said, and in answer to 1949threepence thread question, Yes, I think we probably will.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
40 minutes ago, Diaconis said:

I rue the day we become a totally cashless society. It's bad enough as it is imo (nuff said). With disbelief, I witnessed first hand the distressing effects on a couple of Greek friends with whom I was working in the US in 2016. The financial crisis hit home and from one day to the other they had no access to funds, their bank accounts were frozen and their credit cards were blocked. Technically, 'someone' decided to  render them penniless overnight. Luckily for them they were not stuck in Greece at the time where no-one could buy anything without cash.

I see it as relinquishing power to someone who has no regard for who I am, in which situation I am and views me purely as a cow to milk. 'They' would have the power to sentence me to a life of penury without recourse.  They could incite chaos and anarchy at the push of a button so to speak. No thanks. With cash in pocket we have the power to make at least some decisions and choices if the etherial pot of electronic money ever decides to go pop again. Call me paranoid, a Luddite, or more appropriately here maybe, a Ramage if you will, but I honestly believe that it should be resisted at all cost.

That said, and in answer to 1949threepence thread question, Yes, I think we probably will.

Hear, hear, hear. Very well said Diaconis.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Excellent article by the editor, in the June 2020 edition of "Coin News" about this issue.

It appears that the anti cash brigade are attempting to accelerate its demise by using the excuse of cash being a potentially unhealthy carrier of Covid 19.

Although most people and stores are still accepting cash because they would lose a certain percentage of trade if they didn't, and at the moment they need every penny they can get (no pun intended). As the florist who was interviewed last night said "if I had a £50 bouquet and someone offered me a £50 note, of course I'm going to accept it".  

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/21/2018 at 5:31 PM, Diaconis said:

I rue the day we become a totally cashless society. It's bad enough as it is imo (nuff said). With disbelief, I witnessed first hand the distressing effects on a couple of Greek friends with whom I was working in the US in 2016. The financial crisis hit home and from one day to the other they had no access to funds, their bank accounts were frozen and their credit cards were blocked. Technically, 'someone' decided to  render them penniless overnight. Luckily for them they were not stuck in Greece at the time where no-one could buy anything without cash.

I see it as relinquishing power to someone who has no regard for who I am, in which situation I am and views me purely as a cow to milk. 'They' would have the power to sentence me to a life of penury without recourse.  They could incite chaos and anarchy at the push of a button so to speak. No thanks. With cash in pocket we have the power to make at least some decisions and choices if the etherial pot of electronic money ever decides to go pop again. Call me paranoid, a Luddite, or more appropriately here maybe, a Ramage if you will, but I honestly believe that it should be resisted at all cost.

That said, and in answer to 1949threepence thread question, Yes, I think we probably will.

A well articulated and well thought response.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×