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secret santa

Is the bottom falling out of the Penny market ?

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6 minutes ago, secret santa said:

Uncirculated ? I very much doubt it !!!!!!

She also appears to be the missing appendix variety.

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34 minutes ago, Rob said:

This is the coin I wanted, having been on the list ever since I knew where it was. It went through the Circular at £350 in Sept 1998. Worcester 3d obverse paired with a 2d reverse.

I did wonder who was getting carried away with that one, given the £400-500 estimate. Obviously the significance escaped me. :huh:

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1 minute ago, mrbadexample said:

I did wonder who was getting carried away with that one, given the £400-500 estimate. Obviously the significance escaped me. :huh:

The estimate is going to reflect the book values of £275 Fine and £800 VF for the normal A1 or A2 die pairs with a premium for the novelty of it being a mule. It was always going to fly given I knew of at least one other person who would want it.

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1 hour ago, secret santa said:

Penny Irvine.jpg

Uncirculated ? I very much doubt it !!!!!!

OK, GEF then.

To be honest I hadn't realised at first that she was a glamour model from the 70's. But I put 2 + 2 together and looked up Penny Irving, born 1955.

At 63, she still looks bloody good now !!!

Recent pic.

Penny Irving

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by 1949threepence

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Nicely toned, much lustre remaining...

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23 minutes ago, Coppers said:

Here she is with a mature coin collector...

young mr. grace

A Rumbold EF perhaps? 

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1 hour ago, Peckris said:

A Rumbold EF perhaps? 

Nice though Penny is in 'Are You Being Served' Candy Davies is simply spectacular!!

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Yes that Candy Davis was  a BU GEM i wouldnt be putting that away in a slab ;)

Edited by PWA 1967

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2 hours ago, PWA 1967 said:

Yes that Candy Davis was  a BU GEM i wouldnt be putting that away in a slab ;)

The best old-fashioned term I can think of for her is splendid.

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I can think of other terms Dave but wont put them on here.

They obviously have a good set up for the Auctions DNW after not buying anything yesterday i phoned up to pay for my lots i bought on Tuesday , they arrived this morning.

Hat off to them .

They have always been good each time i have bought from them ,so nice to give someone some credit when its due :)

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On 6/13/2018 at 7:24 PM, Nonmortuus said:

What did it go for in the end Rob? I struggled to watch any of the auction due to work.

I've actually booked leave for the 19th & 20th September when Part 2 of the Hiram Brown collection is up for auction at dnw. They've already got three pages up for preview, and I strongly suspect there will be more. I've saved several to my cabinet. 

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a few edge knockers :lol:

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My question actually did bring one or two serious responses........................

I suppose I should be grateful for small mercies.

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22 minutes ago, secret santa said:

My question actually did bring one or two serious responses........................

I suppose I should be grateful for small mercies.

Someone such as yourself Richard who has collected a long time and watched alot more than most ,what do you think.

I think Jerry is on the right lines low grade varieties when more are found can end up were there is more than the collectors who are prepared to pay good money for them.Coins that are scarce if found in high grade will always command big prices such as the 1862/1 you bought.

I dont think there is more than twenty penny collectors in the country who will pay more than £1K for a low grade variety and without new collectors there is nobody to sell them to as most may already have one.

The question is Richard ....What do you think please ?.

Pete.

Edited by PWA 1967

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I've seen quite a few collections sold over the last 12 years, including some major collections of the more obscure Freeman and Gouby varieties and it does feel to me that there aren't that many (if any) new variety collectors with money to spend.

My theory in general is that we Baby Boomers are the last generation with disposable income together with the nostalgia for the pre-decimal age, in coins, music, stamps, cars etc etc.

When we all pass away I wonder whether the next generation will be interested in the things that we hold precious - all collections may slowly fade away to nothing in value. It's interesting to watch the various antiquey programs and see how items come in and out of fashion, e.g. brown furniture (which I still adore). I'm not sure if they actually ever come back.

As for pennies, it does seem that the proof coins more than hold their value. The 1839 proof penny is not all that rare but continues to rise in prices realised at auction. I suspect that obscure varieties may not be a great investment prospect.

Maybe varieties of mobile phones are the next collectable ?

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Thanks Richard.

Yes i have noticed although only been collecting a few years the proofs going up and up.Maybe they have interest to more wide spread coin collectors or penny collectors who have most of the others.I was looking at the crocker and workman sales earlier (varieties) and very few would IMO acheive the same values now.

I am just going to go in the cuboard and see if there are any mobiles ;)

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44 minutes ago, secret santa said:

Maybe varieties of mobile phones are the next collectable ?

As we move to a cashless society, there may be an increasing lack of nostalgia for coins and banknotes. So my prediction is for credit and debit cards, let’s face it, most get a hammering and 99% are religiously destroyed when they reach their expiry date. 

An unused 1966 Barclaycard may be the future holy grail for collectors :)

 

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And what about Mrs Sloecomes pussy  that was more famous in the seventies than keneth william's Oh, matron.

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1 hour ago, secret santa said:

I've seen quite a few collections sold over the last 12 years, including some major collections of the more obscure Freeman and Gouby varieties and it does feel to me that there aren't that many (if any) new variety collectors with money to spend.

My theory in general is that we Baby Boomers are the last generation with disposable income together with the nostalgia for the pre-decimal age, in coins, music, stamps, cars etc etc.

When we all pass away I wonder whether the next generation will be interested in the things that we hold precious - all collections may slowly fade away to nothing in value. It's interesting to watch the various antiquey programs and see how items come in and out of fashion, e.g. brown furniture (which I still adore). I'm not sure if they actually ever come back.

As for pennies, it does seem that the proof coins more than hold their value. The 1839 proof penny is not all that rare but continues to rise in prices realised at auction. I suspect that obscure varieties may not be a great investment prospect.

Maybe varieties of mobile phones are the next collectable ?

Although collectors are still interested in really ancient coins, so no reason to suppose that pennies won't hold an interest for forthcoming generations. 

One thing to be very cheerful about is the fact that the internet has brought together the coin collecting community in a way that was never possible before. 

Pre internet we would often have been quite isolated, save for clubs in Cities.

 

 

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1 hour ago, davidrj said:

As we move to a cashless society, there may be an increasing lack of nostalgia for coins and banknotes. So my prediction is for credit and debit cards, let’s face it, most get a hammering and 99% are religiously destroyed when they reach their expiry date. 

An unused 1966 Barclaycard may be the future holy grail for collectors :)

 

"As we move to a cashless society, there may be an increasing lack of nostalgia for coins and banknotes." This has crossed my mind too. It can't be long until we pay everything by contactless cards and coins will be be a thing of the past. 

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33 minutes ago, Sword said:

"As we move to a cashless society, there may be an increasing lack of nostalgia for coins and banknotes." This has crossed my mind too. It can't be long until we pay everything by contactless cards and coins will be be a thing of the past. 

I would have thought that might bring about an increase in nostalgia, not an increasing lack of it!

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4 hours ago, secret santa said:

When we all pass away I wonder whether the next generation will be interested in the things that we hold precious - all collections may slowly fade away to nothing in value. It's interesting to watch the various antiquey programs and see how items come in and out of fashion, e.g. brown furniture (which I still adore). I'm not sure if they actually ever come back.

Even before vinyl became passably fashionable again, record fairs were - and are - a thriving business. And who sends postcards now? Yet there's still a healthy market for them. People like little bits of history, particularly if there are rarities involved.

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I wonder what the sales of the updated Freeman book have been, every serious penny collector will surely have bought one, and Gouby’s Specialist Edition too. Chris P, can you help? That is not to say every collector can afford four figure sums,  but it would give an idea of the collector base.

Jerry

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24 minutes ago, jelida said:

I wonder what the sales of the updated Freeman book have been, every serious penny collector will surely have bought one, and Gouby’s Specialist Edition too. Chris P, can you help? That is not to say every collector can afford four figure sums,  but it would give an idea of the collector base.

Jerry

I haven't seen the updated Freeman book, but I gather that the 1860 N over sideways N (Z) is now referred to as a Freeman 10A. 

Edited by 1949threepence

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