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Peckris

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Posts posted by Peckris


  1. I don't think the right hand picture is of a sandblasted die. Unlike the one on the left, the finish is very uneven, like an ordinary example that's simply not been cared for properly. You can see bits of the original lustre which couldn't possibly be present on a sandblasted example - you can compare with the even matt finish on the left.


  2. 23 hours ago, zookeeperz said:

    This is by what I have seen  one of the best 1921 Penny struck. I looked at the LCA and the finest graded by them at 85 pales into insignificance against this Coin. I would imagine this was one of the first coins to be struck. Fantastic strike. I have never seen George with so much hair. Almost a teen-wolf look :) and not a hint of streakiness. reverse complete strike just gorgeous. It will go in the safe place for sure :lol:

     

    That IS very nice indeed. Especially as 1920s and 1921s are often pretty ropey.

    • Like 1

  3. 5 hours ago, AardHawk said:

    I came across this in David Sealy's Coin Varieties column in the December 1969 issue of Coins and Medals.

    That must have come too late for inclusion in his survey of varieties in the 1970 annual - I've posted a link to my scan of that on Page 2 here.


  4. This is just a random selection of 8 favourite tracks (such a choice is in reality impossible):

    - Neneh Cherry & Yousuf N'Dour - 7 Seconds 

    - Laurie Johnson - Theme to 'The Avengers'

    - Love - Alone Again Or

    - The Beach Boys - Surf's Up

    - The Who - Baba O'Riley

    - David Bowie - Life On Mars?

    - Ralph Vaughn-Williams - Fantasia on a theme by Tallis

    - Creedence Clearwater Revival - I Put A Spell On You 

    (no Beatles as I simply found it impossible to isolate just one song)

    • Like 4

  5. 1 hour ago, zookeeperz said:

    I have Rennick's error coins and the normal edition but like most of these guides they kind of roll you around the exact place you are looking for lol. It just amazes me the prices for coins that in the UK anomalies  like die cracks are completely ignored as are doubled die coins. I have a 1934/3 threepence  and a 1922 I think off the top of my head doubled die reverse australian threepence and a 1933/2 Penny. but the penny sadly has been cleaned by some nonk long ago before I came across it. I did ask in other forums about the Doubled die threepence but as usual if fell upon deaf ears. It seems unlike British pre-decimal coins Australia didn't seem to suffer from the same plagues in minting so finding coins that have sold or are being sold are very thin on the ground.

    I think you'll find that UK collectors make a sharp distinction between 'die errors' (which result in a certain number of struck examples) and 'striking errors' (which are usually unique but regarded as curiosities). Die cracks fall somewhere between the two : they're not die varieties strictly, as there is no element of human causation, but on the other hand there could be a number of examples out there. The kind of thing you're talking about can best be illustrated by two examples:

    1. The 1918KN 'crows foot' error on the neck of the portrait. This is distnictive enough to be easily recognised and is collectable, though not at much of a premium over normal.

    2. The die fill that caused the designer initials "EF" to disappear on the reverse of some 1961 halfcrowns. At one time this was regarded as a kosher variety, but not now.

    I think where die faults result in a distinctive rare variety (the 1946 ONE' penny being an example) then you will see them catalogued and collected, otherwise they tend to be ignored.

    • Like 1

  6. I actually don't (not easy for me - I have a different type of disability, though I am good with cameras). It's not very exciting, it's a very thin wavy line to the left of the lighthouse, not quite as high as the lighthouse itself. I've looked for a picture online but Google is no help, and Michael Gouby's / Tony Clayton's sites don't have even a mention let alone a picture. :(


  7. 28 minutes ago, zookeeperz said:

    Incuse wave? Oh no here we go again. Out with the Pennies lols. :) all good fun. Great Info Hawk nice 1 :D

     

    I have the incuse wave variety! Cost me £10 from a Phoenix Fair for a BU specimen  some years ago. (There's one born every minute...)

    Just in case it's of interest, here is the 1970 list of known coin varieties (at that time) by David Sealy and published in the Coins & Medals annual for the year: https://www.dropbox.com/s/zkw5a84yv88c2o8/Coin%20Varieties%201970.pdf?raw=1

    • Like 1

  8. 14 hours ago, youliveyoulean said:

    Re Sword:- "there is slight weakness at the top left of the shield which has almost merged with the crown. I did debate with myself if I should wait for a better struck example. However, I decided that since most 1917 are weak in that area and I might have to wait quite a long time to get fully struck example."

    This is certainly true for the 1917 halfcrowns in particular.

    The whole series, in fact.


  9. 52 minutes ago, Paddy said:

    I don't know how many people here enjoy the Gorillaz as a group - I find them very refreshing. This song - Manana - has a particularly powerful video with it. I often find a feel like the star of this animation - the "powers that be" are out to get me, and even when I am defeated they keep on at me!

    "The" Gorillaz lol. That's like talking about The Pink Floyd, The Genesis, or The 10CC!

    • Like 1

  10. On 26 April 2018 at 10:29 PM, zookeeperz said:

    People who know things on a subject matter and I am guilty myself we seem to think that everyone will know what we are talking about. All fine and dandy if that subject floats your boat too. But if you are a complete novice even the terminology used backs me off asking anything else in fear of looking like a complete simpleton :). I just wished my camera pics were better than my digi-scope pics. I paid a few bob for the camera although granted it isn't a market leader. It has super macro settings so I just surmised we are good to go. Sadly that couldn't be farther from the truth. So it's in it's bag and probably stay there for eternity :lol:

    Mea culpa. When you said "SLR" I assumed you had one and therefore were talking with knowledge, or I wouldn't have started!

    • Like 1

  11. 5 hours ago, zookeeperz said:

    About the best you can get mate with today's cam digi-scopes either get main detail and loss in periphery or full focas and loss in condition I.e luster always looks flat. Which is the trouble with 2D pictures of a 3d subject. I think that only SLR camera's really do coins justice as they have depth of field with no loss in the coins look. I have three lights and a room light but guess where the darkest place is ? yup the bloody coin. It is all about shinning lights in places you wouldn't naturally think to. Indirect lighting is what gives the finish to coins. albeit lesser degree with scopes. Is why sometimes pics look almost pro and other times no matter how you set it up the coin looks dreadful. Which isn't good especially for selling purposes. Even with my camera which isn't an SLR I find it extremely difficult to get that really nice clear pinpoint picture. In fact it never happens. Just took these my decimal bag of coins prob close to 2kg lol. 1/2-1p-2p's-5p-10p all UNC all manor of dates

    I hope you're being generic! Otherwise I'll take that remark with a mighty pinch of salt. A mirrorless ILC is every bit as good as a DSLR, and even a serious enthusiast FLZ (like the Sony RX100 series, Lumix LX10/100, the Canon equivalent, etc) will do a great job, having both good DOF, low noise at high ISO, and fast lenses.

    • Like 1

  12. 12 hours ago, blakeyboy said:

    Orb- I played "Towers of Dub" to a friend of mine who loves Reggae- he'd never heard it 

    and couldn't believe what he was hearing.....everyone should have Victor Lewis-Smith and a dog on their album...

     

    11 hours ago, blakeyboy said:

    Mind you- Dub is easier on this system that I built for the Studio last year- ghastly lamp for scale!!

    No-one should be without a copy of "Dub Side Of The Moon"! (Easy Star All-Stars).


  13. 19 hours ago, ozjohn said:

    A PCGS MS 64 1917 halfcrown listed on Ebay  for comparison. https://www.ebay.com/itm/GR-BRITAIN-George-V-1917-AR-Halfcrown-PCGS-MS64-SCBC-4011-ESC-758/173275070299?hash=item2857ffbf5b:g:vHgAAOSwqMRa1gVK  Sword IMO I think your example is much better than the PCGS example listed on Ebay and I would be very happy to own a coin like the one you have .The PCGS TPG has put the "wear" on the ear, side of head and top of shield in the Ebay listing down to a weak strike. 

    Yes, that's poor. The leopard heads are pretty flat, the ear and moustache are not good, and the hair isn't that crisp either. $356? :o They're having a laugh..


  14. On 24 April 2018 at 10:07 PM, Sword said:

     

    1 - Copy.jpg

     

    Like yours, there is slight weakness at the top left of the shield which has almost merged with the crown. I did debate with myself if I should wait for a better struck example. However, I decided that since most 1917 are weak in that area and I might have to wait quite a long time to get fully struck example. 

     

    Make that "Most George V first reverse halfcrowns". That denomination was the least affected by reverse ghosting, but the high profile bust does cause a regular slight weakness where the shield meets the crown. The guiding principle for GV is hair detail, which is excellent on yours. No point looking for a better one.

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